Catalog for Research Aide Program

Below is a listing of all the courses that are available for the program you are interested in. If you are interested narrowing this list, enter a division and press the 'Search Programs' button. You are allowed to apply for up to 6 of these. Please select the ones you are interested in, then click on either 'Go To Application' buttons on this page to get to the application form for this program. You can also view a list of all divisions.

Applications for the DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI)

Displaying all projects Currently Available for Student and Faculty Appointments

Project Title Description Division
401-ESQ-1 : ESH Training Support The Training and Safety Information (TSI) Group designs, develops, and presents training on environment, safety, and health (ESH) topics throughout the Laboratory. Training programs respond to various DOE, EPA, OSHA, federal, and state regulations, as well as identified ESH training needs. Design, development, and implementation of training may involve work lab-wide with subject matter experts. Varied training needs provide multiple opportunities to undertake creative approaches to instructional design and performance technology as well as technology-based training solutions. Curriculum design, course design, and the associated front end work that incorporates needs analysis, development of performance objectives, and creation of instructionally sound testing mechanisms are used. Evaluation of training programs, courses, means of instruction, and instructor competence are additional facets of ESH Training. As an innovative workplace, Argonne provides a setting that encourages technology-assisted training approaches. These include the design, development, testing for efficacy, and application of Web-Based Training (WBT) strategies involving creative software solutions. Projects include significant concentration on web development and effective optimization between databases.
400-ESQ-1 : ESH Business Systems Support The Training and Safety Information (TSI) Group designs, maintains, and manages a large portfolio of environment, safety, and health (ESH) related business systems and applications. Opportunities exist within the group to help strengthen the portfolio, including data cleanup, data migration, enhancement prioritization, and release testing. Depending on the specific application, this work may include contacting companies and/or researchers for Safety Data Sheets (SDS), evaluating and recommending batch data updates, conducting physical inventory of chemicals, identifying and correcting inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the data records, and tracking and following up with customer actions. Additional work may include participation in functional testing of enhancements, along with some basic system administration tasks. Opportunities are available for entry-level business analysis work and database management, as well as close collaboration with application developers and other information technology (IT) staff.
211-LCF-1 : LCF SCALABLE DATA ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION Data analysis and visualization can efficiently extract knowledge from scientific data. As computational science approaches exascale, however, managing the scale and complexity of the visualization process can be daunting, and there is a critical need to assist scientists with intelligent algorithms that save the most important data and extract the knowledge contained therein. <br />  <br />One approach that our team is investigating is the execution of more of the analysis and visualization pipeline concurrently on leadership machines. This work lays the foundation for in situ analysis to become more widespread and more tightly integrated with computation. In conjunction with large-scale parallel analysis algorithms, we are investigating novel workspaces for scientists to engage their data using first-person perspective, interactive navigation, and binocular 3D vision within the scientists' everyday work environment as an interface to scientific discovery. <br />  <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). <br />
212-LCF-1 : INTERACTIVE INFOGRAPHICS AND ANIMATIONS FOR GENERAL AUDIENCES The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is looking for creative graphic artists and animators to help us tell exciting science and engineering stories to a general audience. The students’ goals will be to apply their curiosity and passion for the work, along with the fundamentals of graphic arts and visual rhetoric, to help create a connection to the receivers of our messages. <br /> <br />There are three areas we would like to develop: 1) the interactive explanation of scientific visualizations produced on ALCF's supercomputing resources, 2) visualizations of how things work such as job submissions for the underlying Blue Gene hardware, and 3) infographics on key demographic and statistical data in the ALCF data warehouse. <br /> <br />This project will certainly use advanced 3D applications and leverage a web-based, animation development environment. The students in this project will be provided with advanced, Mac-based tools and a vast supply of data resources. In addition, they will be working alongside staff and scientists to tease out the core ideas within the science and engineering efforts at ALCF. Finally, the students will be provided mentoring and coaching. <br /> <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov).
213-LCF-1 : BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE AND ANALYTICS APPLIED TO A SCIENTIFIC FACILITY In today's business world, data analytics and business intelligence efforts bring customer and project data to everyone in an organization. If implemented correctly, these rich tools enable all staff to gain a deeper understanding of the core business metrics and take actions to improve the metrics. <br /> <br />A particular challenge in business intelligence is taking flat, specific reports and bundling the data contained in these reports into multi-dimensional data cubes. These cubes must be tailored to specific groups within the organization so they can render existing reports from the cubes. However, the ultimate goal is to present this data so that new reports can be generated without the intervention of a "database expert." <br /> <br />It's not enough to understand how to write code and craft database queries. The team working on this must fundamentally understand the customer and the goals of the organization and help keep the connection between them strong. Today's competitive landscape (in both profit and non-profit work) demands a more integrative, "user experience"-based method in tool development. <br /> <br />The students who take on this challenge will need to draw against broad skills. Programming skills are as important as understanding the scientific workflows and core business of ALCF. Students will be provided training in basic and advanced features of Pentaho, an open-source business intelligence and analytics systems. Students will be mentored by staff reporting to leaders across a high-touch IT organization. <br /> <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). <br />
405-1-LCF : EXECUTE DATA-DRIVEN COMMUNICATION TACTICS AND TRICKS The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) has a deep understanding of every user and project that takes advantage of our resources. Working with our staff the student would help develop and execute a communication strategy that reduces the barriers to entry for our users by seeking out commonalities in the user population, developing personaes, collaborating on a communication plan, executing very targeted plans, and measuring the outcomes. The educational goal of this internship would be to understand how to tie user analytics to communication strategies to increase the performance of our users. Excellent writing skills and a willingness to learn and use Excel, Mailchimp, and Drupal strongly recommended. <br />
406-1-LCF : WRITE SCIENCE STORIES TARGETED AT GENERAL AUDIENCES <br />ALCF has a rich repository of stories that highlight the scientific projects that run on our supercomputer and the exciting results of those projects. Using these science stories as the basis for new material, the student will develop several stories to inform, excite, and fascinate the general public. These stories (and associated imagery) will be developed and formatted for our Drupal website. The educational goal of this internship is to understand audience, synthesize scientific work, and maintain the integrity of the science while making it accessible to a wide audience. Experience collaborating with subject matter experts and technical writing recommended. <br />
407-1-LCF : BUILD DESIGN-CENTERED WEBSITES FOR KEY TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVES The student will collaborate with our communication team to develop design-centered websites in WordPress and Drupal. ALCF has a unique design philosophy it applies to communication materials both traditional and new media. The student will use existing designs and work with internal subject matter experts to develop websites and webpages that feature key technologies and allow users to discover important new methods available at ALCF. The educational goal of this internship would be to practice developing designed-centered website and extend technologies such as WordPress and Drupal to serve the needs of the design. Experience with PHP, CSS, and WordPress recommended. <br />
408-1-LCF : ESTABLISH A NEW-MEDIA CAMPAIGN FOR ALCF EVENT The student will collaborate with our communication and outreach teams to help drive a new media campaign strategy for an ALCF event. The intent of this internship would be to help increase reach, interest, and attendance at ALCF’s workshops. The student will research past events and interview key stakeholders. They will then collaborate with the communications lead on a communications plan. The student will instrument key technologies to provide analytics to measure performance. Finally, they will be responsible for execute the media plan for the event. The educational goal of this internship would be practice developing, instrumenting and executing a media campaign. Some knowledge of process management and experience with Facebook, Linkedin, and Google Analytics recommended, but not required. <br />
409-1-LCF : DEVELOP BUSINESS STRATEGIES IN AN INDUSTRY VERTICAL FOR ALCF Collaborating with Argonne would allow companies to take advantage of state-of-the art computing and computational science, while allowing Argonne to focus research on problems of critical impact to industry. ALCF is seeking a summer intern to work with Argonne staff to identify companies that currently use or have the capability to use high performance computing (HPC) in pursuit of improved products and services. The student will use market research databases, industry meetings and Argonne staff contacts to develop sets of companies likely to benefit from collaboration with Argonne. The ideal student will have skills in marketing and market analysis, coupled with an interest in advancing scientific research. The student should have strong written and verbal communication skills and be comfortable dealing with senior leaders. The student should also have basic knowledge of HPC technology. The student will gain valuable insight into introducing advanced technology into industry and will help build a collaborative strategy that will accelerate technology transfer from lab to business. <br />
183-FMS-2 : Water Treatment Utility Engineering The student will assist the Water Treatment Utility Systems Engineer with the day-to-day functions of utility inspections and oversight, operation of the waste water treatment plants and water distribution system and other day-to-day engineering tasks. The student will also be charged with completing two projects: 1) Inventory of existing warning signs (e.g., confined space), inspecting them, and then purchasing and replacing damaged or illegible signs; and 2) Inventorying and organizing existing utility engineering drawings to consolidate duplicates, eliminate obsoletes and update the most current drawings. Ultimately making the drawings more accessible and usable for water treatment staff.
184-FMS-4 : Sustainability Program Implementation: Waste, Energy & Water Efficiency and Green Mobility Argonne National Laboratory is committed to reducing its environmental footprint. Our site sustainability goals are in line with U.S. Department of Energy goals, outlined in Presidential Executive Order 13693. <br /> <br />Argonne’s Sustainability and Environmental Program works hand-in-hand with programmatic scientists and engineers to develop infrastructure and site-wide improvements that not only reduce the laboratory’s greenhouse gas emissions and energy and water usage, but also help support the laboratory’s scientific mission. <br /> <br />This summer we are focusing on three areas: Pollution Prevention, Energy & Water Efficiency and Green Mobility. This project will important next steps in projects to reduce waste and improve recycling, enhance energy and water efficiency across the site and promote green mobility. Tasks will include planning and implementation for our all-in-one recycling program across the Argonne's buildings, evaluation of energy and water saving projects for next year's fiscal year and observation of projects being installed this summer and tracking of usage for Argonne's bike share program. <br /> <br />The selected candidate will be part of the Facilities Management and Services Division (FMS), working directly for the Sustainability Program Manager. The candidate work in collaboration with two other interns that will be working in FMS throughout the summer and will have cross-training opportunities.
100-CS-1 : Central Shops - Precision Machining, Welding and Fabrication Projects The student will be assigned to assist Argonne manufacturing and welding engineers and other professionals over the course of the summer with precision machining, welding and model fabrication work planning, design, and execution. The student will be exposed to all of the inner workings of work conceptualization, design, materials selection, production step planning, and the execution of work on a variety of high tech and low tech work. The student will assist engineers and managers with their duties and learn both the technical and managerial aspects of working in the machine tool industry.
BIO : ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLE PREPARATION AND SEQUENCING FACILITY The Environmental Sample Preparation and Sequencing Facility (ESPSF) at Argonne National Laboratory is a state-of-the-art facility for nucleic acid extraction, library preparation, and ultra-high throughput sequencing. The core provides resources and services to Argonne National Laboratory users, University of Chicago users, and to the broader scientific community (both US and abroad). ESPSF is involved in a wide range of scientific research from the sequencing of metagenomic samples to both 16S and 18S rRNA amplicon sequencing for microbial community analysis, and ITS sequencing for fungal community analysis. The ESPSF team helps users to determine the most efficient and cost-effective approach to meet their research needs, while also helping design and implement new methods and protocols.
BIO : MACHINE LEARNING-GUIDED DESIGN OF EFFICIENT SAFEGUARD SYSTEMS The growing deployment of engineered organisms for environmental, bioenergy, and industrial applications represents an ever-increasing risk of releasing these organisms in the environment. To limit this risk, efficient safeguards must be developed to prevent the survival of even a small number of released engineered organisms. Safeguard mechanisms based on the controlled activation of a CRISPR nuclease that breaks the chromosome and kills the cell is an attractive design that can work in many species. Genome-wide profiling of CRIPSR nuclease activity is combined with machine learning modeling to predict the most efficient cleavage sites in the genome and facilitate the development of robust safeguard systems.
BIO : APPLICATIONS OF MICROFLUIDICS IN PROTEIN ENGINEERING AND SERIAL CRYSTALLOGRAPHY Droplet microfluidics enables the characterization of large repertoire of variants of a given enzyme. Enzyme variants are generated via protein engineering (directed evolution or rational design). The libraries can be screened in either cell-free or cell-based environments. Droplet microfluidics can be used for generating thousands of small and uniform crystals optimal for serial crystallography. Proteins are screened with a limited library of crystallization reagents and those forming crystals are tested at the Advanced Photon Source using fixed-target serial crystallography.
BIO : BIOPRODUCT RECOVERY The area of separations research requires the need for personnel with training as chemists, chemical engineers, and/or materials scientists to support bioconversion projects that focus on unexplored separations issues that currently limit the potential of many renewable energy technologies. This specific project aims at integrating nanostructured adsorbents into bioprocesses for the facile recovery of biofuels and bioproducts and/or toxic metabolic intermediates.
BIO : METABOLIC ENGINEERING These projects seek to design, engineer, and characterize novel microbial hosts for production of chemical feedstocks and biofuels to supplant petroleum sources. Experience in microbiology, molecular biology and microbial engineering is needed to provide technical support in the area of synthetic biology and microbial engineering. <br /> <br />
EVS : TERRESTRIAL ECOLOGY Terrestrial ecology research includes studies of plant-microbe-soil-atmosphere interactions and biogeochemistry at molecular to landscape scales, with specific emphasis on the belowground ecosystem. Research projects focus on belowground responses to environmental change, improving knowledge of terrestrial components of the global carbon cycle, and characterizing the quantity and potential vulnerability of carbon sequestered in the organic matter of permafrost-region soils.
039-FMPS-1 : FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Focus of the financial management program is to provide accounting, business systems and financial reporting support, and exceptional service to the scientists, engineers, and organizations across the Laboratory. Financial management facilitates the timely and accurate payments to employees and suppliers as well as the appropriate allocation of funding and support costs to programs and projects.
040-FMPS-1 : PROCUREMENT SERVICES Focus of the procurement services program is to provided procurement support and exceptional service to the scientists, engineers, and organizations across the Laboratory. Procurement services facilitates through the procurement process the timely and economical acquisition of standard and complex products and services required by the scientific and operations organizations of Argonne National Laboratory within legal constraints of the regulatory procedures and statutes. <br /> <br /> <br />
041-DSL-1 : DATA SCIENCE AND LEARNING The mission of the DSL Division is to build cross-cutting capability at Argonne to tackle advanced scientific problems where data analysis and AI are the key problem-solving strategies; create a home for expertise in data-intensive computing and machine learning; and build cross-cutting teams that integrate mathematics, computer science, advanced architectures, and deep learning to solve problems in science and engineering. The division has four research thrusts: applying machine learning and data science to science and engineering applications in various domains; building AI software and software infrastructure for managing data, models, workflows, etc.; performing research on AI foundations, mathematics and algorithms, general AI, and reinforcement learning; and exploring and evaluating new hardware architectures and systems for AI. http://www.anl.gov/dsl
313-CPS-1 : COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE The Computational Science Division (CPS) has a broad and exciting portfolio of cutting-edge computationally oriented scientific programs in chemistry and materials, cosmology and astrophysics, fluid dynamics, particle transport, plasma physics, quantum field theory, and quantum information science. While pushing scientific boundaries in solving problems and searching for new discoveries, the division also develops and extends computational methods and techniques focusing on the use of extreme-scale high-performance computing (HPC). Areas of current interest in CPS include exascale scientific applications running on next-generation computational architectures and large-scale data-intensive computing problems, with a focus on AI-driven solutions. New computational approaches that combine the strengths of HPC and AI in both compute- and data-intensive applications are of particular interest. In order to promote its multi-disciplinary vision, CPS division maintains strong links with the rest of the Laboratory and the CELS directorate, in particular, with the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. More information can be found at https://www.anl.gov/cps.
001-AMD : Ceramics Ceramic processing development and new ceramic-materials synthesis for a wide variety of applications are carried out in this section. Much of the work is done on a collaborative basis with other groups both within Argonne. The Ceramics Section staff have fabricated ceramic dielectrics with high permittivity by chemical solution deposition technique. Other areas include membranes for air separation and in-situ process water removal at high-temperatures. Generally, the Ceramics Section work includes microstructural characterization by optical and electron microscopy, phase identification by Xray diffraction and thermal analysis, gas permeation measurements, and electrical characterization. Those interested in hands-on ceramics laboratory work should apply for a position in this section.
002-AMD : Nanomaterials for Energy Applications This Argonne project is focused on developing nanostructured materials for energy applications. In particular, we have projects aimed at third generation solar cells, energy storage devices such as lithium batteries, and improved catalysts for biofuels and energy-saving processes. The core technology for all of these projects is atomic layer deposition (ALD) thin film synthesis. The general strategy is that we start from nanoporous templates and use ALD to apply thin films, atomic monolayers, and nanometer-scale clusters to impart the desired electrical, physical, or optical properties. We are pursuing these applications in conjunction with other groups at Argonne as well as with university collaborators and Industrial sponsors.
003-AMD : Robotics This program supports experimental and theoretical work for improvements and applications of teleoperated robotic systems. Particular emphasis is on implementation of 'teleautonomy' and 'virtual fixture.' In teleautonomy, the robot's autonomous behavior is blended with human instruction for efficient teleoperation. Virtual fixture is an artificially generated surface overlaid on human perception - kinesthetic, visual, and auditory - to help precisely guide the robot motion in teleoperation. The application fields may include operation, inspection, repair, material handling, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and other recently emerging application in manufacturing, scientific experiment automation, robotic surgery and service robots. Research topics of interest include dual-arm collaboration, machine vision and sensing, haptic feedback, machine intelligence, and remote control. Examples of activities for participants include programming, simulation, and hardware implementation and testing.
004-AMD : Wind Turbine Bearing Failure Analysis This project is targeted at improving the reliability of wind turbine drivetrain components through a systematic investigation of critical failure mechanisms of bearings and gears; specifically irregular material transformations, i.e. White Etching Areas or White Etching Cracks (WEC). This tribological issue is reported to be a predominant cause of early failures occurring as early as 1-3% of design life; and is reported to cause up to 80% of failures in high-speed bearings. This project will analyze failed bearings and link operational and material factors to the occurrence of the failures. Bench-top test methodology will be developed to conduct accelerated/low-cost evaluation of current industrially available materials, coatings and lubricants. Applicants will conduct metallurgical analysis, tribological bench-top test development, fatigue testing, and sample preparation. Applicants are expected to have hands-on experience with bench-top testing and test method development.
001-CFC : Material Management and Minimization- Reactor Conversion Program (M3-Reactor Conversion) The DOE Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20) supports the activities of the M3 Reactor Conversion program (NA-231), previously known as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion program and before that Reduced Enriched Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. The goal of the M3 Reactor Conversion program is to minimize and eventually eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian applications. The program achieves its goal by converting research and test reactors to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in converting the majority of research and test reactors which used HEU to the use of LEU fuel. Current activities focus on development of more advanced, higher density LEU fuels that will allow the conversion of high flux research and test reactors, collaboration with Russian HEU minimization efforts and other international participants in fuel development, development of an LEU-based process to produce Mo-99, and technical assistance to research reactors wishing to convert to LEU.
002-CFC : Molten Salt Properties Various molten salts are being evaluated for use in advanced nuclear power reactors, for solar energy storage, and as electrolytes in the electrochemical processes including the recycle of used nuclear fuels. Knowing the thermochemical and thermophysical properties of molten salts and how they vary with temperature, salt composition and impurity content is essential to all processes using molten salts. Important properties of various molten salts are being quantified to support use in different applications and the development of composition-based predictive models. Laboratory experience with high temperature materials is desirable.
001-DIS : Infrastructure Assurance The Division has worked to develop Argonne as the lead laboratory for infrastructure protection with the Department of Homeland Security and infrastructure analysis and interdependencies with the Department of Energy. The Division’s infrastructure expertise is supported by a large suite of models, simulation tools, extensive databases, and planning tools that include: * Regional resiliency assessment and resilient cities initiatives * Security and resilience assessments of critical infrastructure * Climate change adaptation planning* GIS-based gas supply system database * Gas and electricity energy supply systems modeling and simulation * Toolset to analyze the condition of gas supply systems * Comprehensive U.S. electric supply system database * Infrastructure analysis in gas, oil, electricity, telecommunications, transportation, and water * Identification and quantification of impacts from infrastructure interdependencies
002-DIS : Packaging Certification & Life Cycle Management Group The Packaging Certification & Life Cycle Management (PCLCM) Group provides technical support to DOE, NNSA, NRC, and DHS, and collaborates with research institutions in Japan, Germany, industry, and IAEA. The technical support activities include packaging, transportation, storage and disposition of nuclear and other radioactive materials. The activities involve storage standards, aging management of packages, and ARG-US remote monitoring systems technology to enhance safety, security and safeguards of high-risk materials in storage, transportation and disposal. The ARG-US remote monitoring systems technology consists of two (2) major platforms: active RFID tags for packages in storage and transportation with fixed readers or CommBox; and Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM)/TRAVELER in wired and wireless sensor network (WSN) for critical facilities, transportation, and emergency response and recovery operations. Multiple opportunities exist on the development of specialty sensors, power management, wired and wireless communication, embedded software and web user interface development, testing and system integration, full system demo, field testing and applications at selected DOE sites and industry locations. Structural health monitoring, data analytics, and edge computing are among the current R&D focus and interests of PCLCM.
003-DIS : Supply Chain Modeling Division researchers are developing a dynamic agent-based model of critical and strategic material markets and supply chains. The models include regional interacting agents at all stages in the supply chain from mining to final products. The agents in the model are represented by attributes and decision behaviors, derived from economic and market theories, for pricing, purchasing, production, sales, technology choice, and inventory management. Model results will inform strategic material assessments and policies. Project tasks include: * Research specific supply chains with the objectives to derive methods and compile data to effectively model them. * Conduct simulations and analyze results, with particular focus on supply chain sustainability and resilience. * Develop methods to effectively visualize and communicate model results and associated uncertainties.
022-ES : Supply Chain Modeling Division researchers are developing a dynamic agent-based model of critical and strategic material markets and supply chains. The models include regional interacting agents at all stages in the supply chain from mining to final products. The agents in the model are represented by attributes and decision behaviors, derived from economic and market theories, for pricing, purchasing, production, sales, technology choice, and inventory management. Model results will inform strategic material assessments and policies. Project tasks include:* Research specific supply chains with the objectives to derive methods and compile data to effectively model them. * Conduct simulations and analyze results, with particular focus on supply chain sustainability and resilience. * Develop methods to effectively visualize and communicate model results and associated uncertainties.
001-EOF : Computational Material Science and the Mechanics of Materials This program involves the development of simulation methods and modeling and simulation studies examining the fundamental, microstructural mechanisms that cause the deformation, degration, and failure of materials operating in challenging environments. Simulation methods include crystal plasticity finite element calculations, interface damage models, and continuum damage mechanics. Applications focus on high temperature nuclear reactors, concentrating solar power, and other high temperature service conditions. A key aspect of the program is post-processing large simulation datasets to better understand the processes leading to macroscale material failure.
002-EOF : Computer Studies in Engineering Mechanics Program The program is concerned with the development of modern computational mechanics tools (using the finite element method) as well as optimized output data visualization tools applied to complex engineering mechanics problems found in industry and reactor safety analysis. Recent research in uncertainty analysis has been performed to develop new methods to quantify the relative variations in the response of structures to variations in the loading, material, and geometric inputs to determine system reliability and measures of safety more accurately. There is an interest in the capability of scaling up finite element simulations from single workstations to high performance computing clusters. Additional research areas include fluid-structure interaction, thermochemical analysis, high temperature fatigue response, and seismic simulations as applied to advanced nuclear reactors.
001-ES : Advanced Grid Modeling – Optimization and Analytics Development of mathematical models, optimization algorithms, and simulation methods for power system operations and planning. Focus on math programming, computational algorithms, control theories/applications, and PDE/DAE solutions, machine learning, quantum computing.
002-ES : Advanced Grid Modeling – Planning, Operations, and Controls Modeling and simulation of DERs, DMS, DERMS, Cybersecurity, co-simulation of transmission and distribution systems, load, energy storage systems, application development using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL).
003-ES : Advanced Propulsion Systems - Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions (AVTC) The student / faculty will work to research, develop, and refine activities relevant to AVTCs, focused on the integration, modeling, and control of electrified vehicle propulsion systems. The student / faculty will be responsible for the development and execution of vehicle testing plans, both for on-road and dynamometer testing. As a result, data collection, analysis, and consolidation will be part of the student / faculty function. The vehicle test data is used to develop AVTC activities for participating universities. Additional activities include collaborating with other AVTC staff to develop general competition activities including, but not limited to: Connected and Autonomous Vehicle (CAV) Systems, customer research and implementation, and overall AVTC process improvement. An individual with background in mechanical or electrical engineering (or similar) is requested to assist in the design and implementation of experiments, gather and analyze data collected from vehicle testing (engines, battery packs, motors, etc.) and assist in the publication of reports and technical papers.
004-ES : Advanced Vehicle and Powertrain Control The Vehicle and Mobility Systems Group develops advanced vehicle and powertrain control and tools (RoadRunner, SVTrip) to reduce energy consumption on real world driving conditions with a focus on electrification, connectivity and automation.
005-ES : Assessment of Marketability of Vehicle Technologies and Transportation Fuels The Systems Assessment Center of the Energy Systems Division conducts analytical research to evaluate new transportation technologies and alternative fuels in terms of their marketability and their potential for reducing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions. The Center has developed computerized models for market penetration of new vehicle technologies and for estimating future transportation energy demand under alternative scenarios. The student will work on improving the underlying analytical methods to examine market potentials of new vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels with the computerized models. The student will employ the models to develop results of energy use and emissions of vehicle/fuel deployment scenarios.
006-ES : Building Modeling Modeling and analysis of buildings and building systems. Whole building energy modeling. Indoor environmental quality modeling. Modeling of impacts of climate change on buildings and building systems. Modeling of building-grid interaction.
007-ES : Building Technologies Development of energy efficient and grid interactive building technologies including walls, windows, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and advanced building controls. Technoeconomic analysis of new building technologies.
008-ES : Chemical, Manufacturing System Modeling, Optimization and Analytics Modeling of energy use, water use, and emissions of chemical, manufacturing, and industrial systems. Life cycle analysis of chemical, mechanical, and industrial processes. Optimization of chemical, manufacturing, and industrial processes.
009-ES : Computational Multi-Physics Research The student or faculty will work on developing predictive simulation capabilities for a wide range of applications ranging from piston engines, gas turbines, and manufacturing processes. The student or faculty will leverage high-performance computing and AI/ML tools, in collaborations with researchers within the group. Simulation data collection, analysis and consolidation will be part of the student/faculty function.
010-ES : Connected and Automated Vehicle Systems - Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions (AVTC) Research and development activity focused on designing and implementing test methodologies and systems to evaluate Connected and Automated features in vehicles including development of hardware and software systems to aid testing for longitudinal control and vehicle connectivity. Connectivity-related development is directed towards developing simulations, hardware, and software systems to equip and evaluate vehicles with Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication-driven features.  Individuals with a background in computer science, computer engineering, or mechanical engineering with an understanding of automotive sensors and controls are required to assist in various sub-projects. Knowledge of Matlab/Simulink, programming skills in C++/Python, and vehicle networking, such as CAN communication are highly desirable. 
011-ES : Deployment of Alternative Fuel Vehicles The Systems Assessment Group of the Center for Transportation Research has been working with Department of Energy’s Clean Cities Program to deploy alternative fuel vehicles into the U.S. market. The Clean Cities Program develops government and industry local coalitions to strategically deploy alternative fuel vehicles and other technologies that reduce petroleum consumption. Fleets are important to the success of alternative fuel vehicles as they are often the early adopters of these technologies. The student will help identify technologies that best fit the wide ranging fleet applications, and develop tools for Clean Cities coalitions to analyze the energy, environmental, and economic impacts of implementing alternative technologies. The student will work on providing analytical support to the Clean Cities Program and will work with local coalitions to develop deployment strategies.
012-ES : Economic Analysis of Fuel Infrastructure for Active Fuels, Electricity and Hydrogen The Systems Assessment Center of the Energy Systems Division evaluates energy, economic and environmental impacts of refueling infrastructure needs for vehicles using alternative fuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The student will assist in the development of models to permit economic analyses of electricity, hydrogen and alternative fuels such as natural gas and renewable natural gas; and in analyses of opportunities for and benefits of electricity, hydrogen, and alternative fuels.
013-ES : Electrified Aviation System Simulation The Vehicle and Mobility Systems Group is analyzing the potential of electrified aviation at the system level across a wide range of applications through system simulation (Aeronomie).
014-ES : Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis The Center develops energy demand projections, evaluates alternative energy supply systems, and evaluates energy and environmental policies bearing on energy development. The Center’s work includes models used to make energy market decisions and a suite of energy, environmental, and economic models, now used in more than 60 countries.
015-ES : Engine Research The student or faculty will work on test engines to make performance and emissions measurements. Additional projects involve characterization of diesel and gasoline fuel sprays using lasers and x-rays. Evaluation of renewable fuels in engines is an important part of the students assignment. Data collection, analysis and consolidation will be part of the student/faculty function.
016-ES : Experimental Vehicle Assessment The student or faculty will work to acquire and analyze vehicle and component test data from advanced propulsion systems and alternative fuels. Experimental assessments are performed on road, on track and at Argonne’s Advanced Mobility Technology Laboratory (AMTL). The AMTL is an integrated chassis dynamometer test facility capable of testing vehicles and powertrain components by means of state-of-the-art measurement equipment and control hardware. AMTL staff conducts assessments of advanced vehicle technologies including conventional, electrified as well as connected and automated vehicles. The test data are used to develop and validate the DOE vehicle simulation models. A mechanical or electrical engineer is required to assist in the design and implementation of experiments, gather and analyze data collected from complex testing of engines, battery packs, motors and vehicles, and assist in the publication of reports and technical papers.
017-ES : Impact of Smart Mobility at the Transportation System The Vehicle and Mobility Systems Group estimates the impact of new mobility technologies (e.g., TNC, e-commerce, sharing…) on passenger and good movements at the metropolitan area level using agent based system simulation (POLARIS).
018-ES : Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle Technologies The Systems Assessment Center of the Energy Systems Division has developed the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Technologies) model that examines energy and environmental impacts of vehicle technologies, transportation fuels, energy systems and other technologies such as buildings technologies. As of end of 2019, the model was being used by more than 40,000 researchers and analysts worldwide. The group expands and uses GREET to evaluate a range of energy and environmental impacts of transportation fuels such as biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen and advanced vehicle technologies such as hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles. The student will work with the group to examine vehicle technologies, new fuel production pathways, the electric sector, and building technologies to provide holistic results so that technologies and fuels can achieve energy and environmental sustainability systematically.
019-ES : Model-based System Engineering The Vehicle and Mobility Systems Group develops software tools (AMBER) and methods (i.e. Plug&play architecture, large scale simulation...) to accelerate the introduction of advanced vehicle technologies into the market place.
020-ES : Power Systems and Markets Research Modeling and analysis of electric power systems, generation and demand technologies, and electricity markets in the U.S. and abroad. Integration of variable renewables, such as wind and solar, into the power systems. Energy storage technologies and their role and value in providing reliability and resilience to power system operations. Modeling and simulation of hydropower and pumped storage technologies. Production cost modeling and integrated resource planning of power systems.
021-ES : Smart Cities Modeling, analysis, and technology development for smart cities. Coupled modeling of city systems including buildings, transportation, grid, and environment. Assessment of climate change on cities and regions. Development of sensors for smart cities.
023-ES : Vehicle Systems Modeling and Simulation The Vehicle and Mobility Systems Group estimates the impact of advanced vehicle technologies with a focus on electrification on energy consumption and cost across vehicle classes (light to medium and heavy duty) using system simulation (e.g., Autonomie) as well as vehicle test data.
024-ES : Vehicle Systems Smart Grid The student or faculty will work on supporting activities aimed at more efficiently integrating electrified vehicles with the electricity grid. Tasks include smart vehicle charging management as well as validation of proposed technologies to allow communication between the vehicle’s smart charger and the electric infrastructure smart meter to enable rapid commercialization of PHEVs and EVs. An electrical engineer will assist with testing to benchmark communication technologies and validate international communication and hardware standards during their development. Data compilation, analysis and reporting will be additional tasks.
025-ES : Vehicle User Experience – Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions (AVTC) This project focuses on assessing the user experience (UX) associated with operating a semi-autonomous vehicle. Students or faculty will be involved in researching topics including: UX, customer experience (CX), human factors, human-machine interface (HMI), user centric design processes, and more. They will collaborate with individuals in government, academia, and the automotive industry to develop: 1) training resources for university students who are striving to improve driver’s user experience 2) methodology to fairly evaluate and compare the UX and CX associated with different vehicles 3) methodology to fairly evaluate and compare the UX, effectiveness, and feasibility of industry adaption associated with various prototypes for educating drivers on semi-autonomous vehicle features 4) proposals for how to better integrate customer feedback into the traditional vehicle design process. This project is open to individuals with any educational background.
001-NSE : Advanced Materials for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) is a leading candidate for recycling used fuel to close the fuel cycle and for power generation. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of next-generation sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Structural materials of SFRs will be exposed to harsh operating environments including high temperature, stress, sodium exposure, and neutron irradiation. Our research activities of SFR materials include advanced alloy development, mechanical property testing and microstructure characterization, sodium exposure and thermal aging studies to evaluate and understand the effects of stress, temperature and sodium exposures on microstructure and mechanical properties of advanced materials.
002-NSE : Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) Systems Investigations are performed to develop and design experimental accelerator subcritical system including target physics and design for generating neutrons, subcritical assembly physics and design, system safety analyses, operation and control, and material selection and analyses.
003-NSE : Advanced Reactor Concept Development and Experimentation Opportunities exist for students to participate in development, analysis, and experimental activities supporting innovative concepts for future nuclear power plants. The advanced concepts emphasize passive safety, nonproliferation, long core lifetime, simplicity, low cost, and high reliability. Students will work with experienced researchers to study existing concepts, address new approaches, develop and utilize analytical models, and perform trade-off and optimizing studies. Specific disciplines of interest include heat transfer, fluid mechanics, materials science, heat exchanger technology, steam/gas turbine technology, component design, mechanical/mechanisms design, and cost/efficiency modeling. Students may also select to participate in experiment activities including development of apparatus, assist staff in conducting experiments, interpret results, and compare data with model predictions.
004-NSE : Analysis and Modeling of Materials Behavior in Energy Systems A modern, high-speed, digital computer is employed to simulate the physical behavior of materials used in advanced energy systems (fission and fusion). In the fission area, the thermal, mechanical, and irradiation response of fuel elements for the M3 Reactor Conversion program are analyzed. Emphasis is placed on realistic models that accurately describe the physical situation. The DART code system is being developed in order to assess the behavior of dispersion fuels for the M3 Reactor Conversion program. In the fusion area, the thermal, mechanical, and irradiation performance of solid breeders (Li2O and other ternary oxides) are being modeled.
005-NSE : Applications of Accelerator Driven Systems Studies are carried to examine the different applications of accelerator driven systems including disposal of spent nuclear fuel, medical isotope production, generating nuclear energy, and utilizing thorium material for nuclear energy production.
006-NSE : Computational Studies of Nuclear Reactors Analyses are performed to predict the behavior of nuclear reactor systems in steady state or in operational and accidental transients. Large-scale computer codes containing models of heat transfer, single and two-phase flow, reactor physics (cross section data processing, reactor statics, fuel depletion, and reactor kinetics), and structural-mechanical behavior are employed. The participant should have a basic understanding of one or more of the following areas: heat transfer, fluid flow, reactor physics, structural mechanics, and a working knowledge of computer programming . Experience with large-scale scientific computer codes and applications are desirable.
007-NSE : Degradation of Reactor Core Internal Materials for Light Water Reactors The performance of structural materials of reactor core environments is critical for the safe and economic operation of commercial light water reactors. Exposed to an intensive irradiation and corrosive environment, the reactor core internal materials undergo significant microstructural changes during power operation. Various irradiation effects, such as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking, irradiation embrittlement, radiation-induced segregations, and void swelling, could occur during service, leading to deteriorated mechanical properties, elevated cracking susceptibility, and even geometrical instability of core internals. Our research program aims to (1) assess the extent of degradation through mechanical testing and microstructural characterization, and (2) improve our understanding on the degradation mechanisms of reactor core internal materials. Research background in the areas of mechanical testing, physical metallurgy, corrosion, microstructural characterization, and x-ray diffraction are desirable.
008-NSE : Irradiation Performance of Reactor Materials The principal objective of the programs in the Irradiation Performance Section is to assess the behavior of nuclear materials, including cladding and structural components, in the environment of nuclear fission and fusion reactors. These environments result in neutron damage and chemical, metallurgical, and mechanical processes that occur over a wide range of elevated temperatures. The programs fall into the following categories: (1) postirradiation characterization of materials, and (2) postirradiation thermal/mechanical testing of materials. A significant fraction of the Section’s activity is devoted to the performance characterization of light-water reactor fuel systems during loss of coolant accidents and spent-nuclear-fuel cask transport accidents. The postirradiation characterization and testing activities utilize the Irradiated Materials Laboratory and other radiological-controlled laboratories to perform examination, testing and analyses. Available research tools include optical microscopes, transmission electron microscope, hydrogen and oxygen determinators, and numerous thermal and mechanical testing instruments. Cooperative research programs are welcome.
009-NSE : Liquid Metal Experiments Supporting Advanced Reactors A number of studies are under way involving various aspects of liquid metal technology, primarily involving advanced system, components, instrumentation, and controls systems for liquid metal applications. These may include studies on gears, bearings, and other mechanisms performance in sodium, studies of advanced sensors and instrumentation in sodium for measuring temperature, flow, pressure, level, and impurity sensors. In addition, activities are on-going related to liquid metal viewing technologies and other non-destructive examination methods. These studies will closely coincide with ongoing laboratory experimental programs studying liquid metal phenomena. The participants work with staff who are developing the experimental demonstrations and measurement techniques, as well as the assembly and operation of the experimental apparatus.
010-NSE : Metal Additive Manufacturing Additive manufacturing (AM) builds parts layer by layer into 3D shapes from computer design files. It offers unprecedented opportunities to advance nuclear technologies in terms of design innovation, new materials development, sensor integration, and so on. Metal additive manufacturing in Argonne’s Nuclear Science & Engineering (NSE) Division is a rapid-expanding research area with the focus on fabrication of additively manufactured alloys, post-build treatment, and structure and property evaluation, and understanding fundamental manufacturing science through in situ experimentation with synchrotron X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source to understand the processing-structure-property relationships.
011-NSE : Multi-Physics Computational Analysis Development of multi-physics analysis model of advanced reactors by coupling neutronics, structural mechanics, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel behavior codes. The coupling codes include legacy codes or high fidelity code, or both for understanding advanced reactor performance, including power, structural behavior, thermos-physical behaviors, and fuel performances. Knowledge of nuclear engineering in general, reactor physics, mechanics, heat transfer, and numerical methods, Fortran 90/95, Python, C++, MPI, parallel programming and Linux would be desirable.  
012-NSE : Nuclear Fuel Cycle Systems Modeling Argonne continues to develop state-of-the-art tools that model the complex, interconnected nuclear reactor fleet and fuel cycle systems from mining, enrichment, and fuel fabrication to reactor physics, fuel recycling, and waste disposal. These simulators use both agent-based and system dynamics approaches where appropriate and leverage existing software platforms for ease of computational development and interconnection of multiphysics. These tools are often called upon by the US DOE and international nuclear working parties to produce time-dependent calculations of future nuclear deployment scenarios for various countries and advanced reactor technologies.
013-NSE : Probabilistic Risk Assessment Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) activities include development of probabilistic methods for applications to safety analysis of nuclear and other industrial facilities including consequence analysis; basic plant component failure data analysis; systems reliability modeling with common cause failure; sensitivity theory methods and applications in PRA; use of PRA techniques in support of plants modifications and maintenance, including analysis of human factors in procedures; uncertainty analysis and quantification; and regulatory uses of risk management.
014-NSE : Reactor Safety Analysis Perform analyses in support of nuclear reactor design and licensing efforts. This includes developing and utilizing system code models for the assessment of transient scenarios. Knowledge of topics such as fluid dynamics, heat transfer, reactor kinetics is desirable, along with any previous experience with reactor transient and accident analysis methods and computational modeling of advanced (non-light water) reactor designs.
015-NSE : Sensors, Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation The Sensors, Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation (SINDE) Section conducts research and development in a broad range of energy-related technologies. Major areas of responsibilities are the development of sensors and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for energy (nuclear and fossil), conservation, automobile, transportation and waste management, as well as for arms control and verification treaties and homeland security. The current instrumentation efforts of the Section focus on the development of advanced sensors and control systems. This work encompasses (a) multiphase flow measurement techniques, including in situ measurement of temperature, fluid level, pressure, density, and viscosity; (b) development of leak detection and location systems for power plants; and (c) for arms control to develop sensor/instruments for treaty verification and homeland/national security. Sensors used in the treaty verification project and homeland security projects are based on acoustic, microwave, submillimeter/terahertz, and mass spectrometer techniques. The instruments are used to detect chemical, biological or nuclear agents as well as explosives. Our NDE efforts focus on development of techniques and systems for materials characterization and for evaluation of component reliability. This work includes (a) characterizing materials, including ceramic composites and metal alloys, during various stages of fabrication; (b) evaluating the structural integrity of components of a wide variety of energy systems; and (c) pinpointing causes and remedies for improper component behavior through failure analysis. The techniques used to perform this work are based on eddy current testing, microwave/millimeter-wave sensing, acoustic emission, X-ray testing (radiography, diffraction and tomography), optical methods, NMR spectroscopy and imaging, neutron diffraction and thermal imaging and tomography in their various forms.
016-NSE : Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Light-Water Reactor Materials in Simulated Coolant Environments The program involves an experimental investigation of the influence of simulated reactor-coolant environments, under normal and off-normal water chemistry conditions, on the susceptibility of piping and structural materials to stress-corrosion cracking. The effect of microstructure of the materials, water chemistry (viz. oxygen, hydrogen and impurity concentrations, pH), and temperature on the rate and mode of crack growth is being determined for a range of loading conditions. Background in the areas of electrochemistry, electron microscopy, aqueous corrosion, and physical metallurgy are applicable.
017-NSE : Synchrotron X-ray Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials Recent developments in synchrotron X-ray characterization tools have provided us unprecedented time and spatial resolution and in situ capability with extremely complex sample environments, shedding new light into the mechanisms and pathways of microstructural evolution and its correlation with material’s macroscopic behavior. The high penetrating power of high-energy X-rays allow for construction of complex but robust sample chambers that provide a variety of sample environments involving temperature, load/pressure, corrosive conditions that are significantly difficult or impossible to achieve with other techniques, providing measurements of bulk materials under real conditions in real time. We are using synchrotron high-energy X-rays to study the evolution of irradiation defects, phase transformation and their interactions with materials’ deformation and fracture behaviors.
018-NSE : TEM with in Situ Ion Irradiation of Nuclear Materials Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in situ ion beam irradiation is an essential tool for understanding fundamental radiation effects, critical to the development of advanced new materials and predictive models of nuclear materials and fuels. The IVEM-Tandem Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory is a dual-ion beam facility for in situ TEM studies of defect structures in materials under controlled ion irradiation/implantation, temperature and stress conditions. As the world-leading research facility, the IVEM has made important contributions to the understanding of physical phenomena of radiation damage and development of radiation-resistant materials. Our research focus on understanding of radiation defects in advanced nuclear materials and fuels, storage materials for spent fuels, and validation and verification of computer modeling and simulations of radiation damage.
019-NSE : Thermal Fluid Analysis of Complex, Integral Engineering Systems Development and application of advanced analysis tools and methods to address problems involving complex geometric configurations and multi-physics phenomena that are generally thermally driven. Current applications include analysis of thermal and fluidic behavior of full-scale engineering systems and components in support of design and licensing of advanced nuclear reactors. The state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics code Nek5000 is used as the base software in these applications.
001-SSS : Advanced Modeling, Simulation, and Analytics The division develops complex models, integrate cutting edge technology, and develop analytical tools to support energy and national security. Projects include: * modeling deployment (transportation) and resupply of forces throughout the world * modeling complex supply chains for critical materials * modeling the disposition and transportation of spent nuclear material * modeling radio frequency interactions of radars on air, land, and sea. The development of these projections include a variety of technologies including: * planning, * simulation, * optimization, * scheduling, *network optimization, *ontological concept management, * process engineering, * big data / data lakes, * machine learning, * high performance computing. These projects tend to have an inherently synergistic, integrative focus that provides research opportunities for computer-literate investigators with interests and expertise in a wide variety academic disciplines.
002-SSS : Cyber Operations, Analysis, and Research To ensure the resilience of U.S. infrastructure, it is essential that networks associated with infrastructure assets are protected against increasingly frequent cyber attacks. Argonne's S3 cyber research team develop and implement the tools and provides the expertise to conduct extensive network analysis to support federal agencies, military sponsors, and commercial organizations in efforts to improve the security and resilience of their network design and operations. The cyber research team is seeking candidates interested in exploring cutting edge research in the field of cybersecurity, specifically focused on the needs and special problems of critical infrastructure protection. Specific topics include critical infrastructure sector analysis, moving target defense, defensive and offensive techniques for botnet protection and infiltration, dependency and interdependency visualization, augmented reality technology for first responders, satellite cybersecurity, CANbus and VAnet attack and defense, big data analysis and visualization, machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithm development and application, encryption technology, and social engineering.
003-SSS : National Security Information Systems The focus of this research area is the development of advanced web-based database applications for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Defense, and Department of Homeland Security. Multiple information technology projects are conducted by the section in the areas of industrial security, nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear forensics, incident response, and defense logistics.
004-SSS : Radiation Detection Technology Advanced radiation detectors are required for both basic science missions and for applied research in such areas as national security. These activities entail the development of advanced gamma ray and neutron detectors and require physics, engineering or computer programming support in the following areas: * development of detector materials for gamma-rays and x-rays, * fast and thermal neutron detectors for detection of nuclear materials, * development of algorithms for gamma spectroscopy using heavily degraded * spectra, * electronics design for small detector packages, * computer simulations of radiation transport and neutron and gamma detector responses, and * development of algorithms for integrated and distributed detector systems.
005-SSS : Sealed Radioactive Source Library Sealed radioactive sources are sold and used worldwide in industry, medicine, and research. However, it is well-known that they could also be used by terrorists to make a radiological dispersal device (e.g., dirty bomb). The Nuclear Forensics Program at ANL is working with manufacturers in the sealed sources industry to create a library of forensics signatures that will be utilized in the event that a dirty bomb is deployed or interdicted. Because most source manufacturers are foreign, the Program hires students with skills in target languages, including Korean, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, Hindi, German, French, and Spanish. Students should have some knowledge in chemistry, but no knowledge or experience with radioactive materials is required. Students will use their foreign language and creative internet search skills to capture information about radioactive materials in foreign countries. They will not work in a laboratory or handle radioactive materials. They may interact directly with manufacturers, technical representatives, corporate business managers, and federal agencies, as well as experts in nuclear forensics.
005-AMD : Continuous Flow Synthesis of Advanced Electrolyte Materials To advance to the next generation of a safer, more efficient, higher energy density batteries scientist are looking for new chemistries and new formulation for electrolytes. Electrolytes for new generation advanced lithium-ion batteries need to be chemically and electrochemically stable, non-toxic and non-flammable. This project involves design, synthesis, analysis and evaluation of new solvents, salts and additives to improve performance, stability and safety of cells for high voltage/high energy lithium-ion batteries that can operates in a wide temperatures range. The selected candidate will work hand-to-hand with top scientists in the field and will learn cutting-edge emerging technologies and instrumentation with particular focus on continuous flow chemistry in microfluidic reactors.
006-AMD : Continuous Flow Synthesis of Nanomaterials with Controlled Morphology Nanomaterials are gaining interest and find applications in many innovative technologies. Relatively easy to make in a milligram scale in the lab they are notoriously difficult to scale up and produced in quantities required in real life applications. The project applies continuous flow chemistry to develop platform for manufacturing nanomaterials with desired composition and morphology at scale. Although the current focus is on nanosized particles of platinum alloys for fuel cell catalysts, the project is aimed to develop science based, data driven methodology to produce advanced material for various applications.
007-AMD : Aerosol Assisted Flame Spray/Spray Pyrolysis Synthesis of Materials Argonne’s MERF housing combustion synthesis research program that leverages the power of science and engineering to deliver significant process improvement insights for manufacturers of powder- and particulate-based nanomaterials using flame spray and reactive spray pyrolysis technologies. Flame spray synthesis is a versatile process that allows for commodity-scale production of a very broad range of nanomaterials that includes silica, metallic, oxide and alloy powders or particulate films. New complex materials and predictive manufacturing processes to optimize quality control can be designed by leveraging in-situ diagnostics, computer modeling, scale-up technology and expertise in combustion engineering, aerosol and materials sciences.
008-AMD : Hydro/Solvothermal Synthesis of Materials in Supercritical Fluids This project utilizes patented hydrothermal synthesis process that, for the first time, enables the scalable manufacturing of highly valuable nanoparticles, including thermochromic material for smarter windows. Argonne has also developed a novel, supercritical hydro/solvothermal synthesis process to produce single crystal materials for energy storage. Solution-phase based hydrothermal synthesis uses a continuous flow micro-reactor as well as a batch reactor operates in supercritical fluid. The process enables adjustments to reaction pressure, temperature, residence time, reactant concentration, solvent type, and other factors to exactly control particle structure and size distribution.
009-AMD : Tailor Vortex Reactor Platform of Synthesis of Advanced Cathode Materials In the quest for safer, more efficient, higher energy density batteries scientist are looking for new chemistries of electrodes as well as new formulation for electrolytes. Electrodes for new generation advanced lithium-ion batteries need to be chemically, thermally and electrochemically stable, non-toxic and inexpensive to manufacture. This project involves design, synthesis, advanced characterization and electrochemical performance evaluation of new cathode materials with improved performance, stability and safety of cells for high voltage/high energy lithium-ion batteries that can operates in a wide temperatures range. The selected candidate will work hand-to-hand with top scientists in the field and will learn cutting-edge emerging technologies and instrumentation including Taylor Vortex Reactor.
006-SSS : Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear (CBRN) Nonproliferation Complex and enduring threats to national and global security exist because of the proliferation and diversion of CBRN technologies and materials to WMD programs.  The Strategic Security Sciences (S3) Division researches, develops, and implements practical approaches and technical solutions to address these complex and enduring threats.  The student will collaborate with S3 researchers that combine technical expertise in CBRN science and engineering with specialized knowledge of nonproliferation policies and programs to develop practical approaches and technical solutions to achieve nonproliferation objectives.   Specific areas of research include International Nuclear Safeguards, Export Controls, Arms Control Verification, and  Emerging Technologies.
100-APS-1 : ACCELERATOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Current research activities include accelerator physics research, charged-particle beam dynamics calculations, particle-beam transport design, measurement of accelerator magnets, fabrication and testing of vacuum system chambers, radio-frequency acceleration system measurements, accelerator diagnostic system research and development, and computer-based accelerator control system. APS:Advanced Photon Source
101-APS-1 : ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEMS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION To facilitate a transition to a hydrogen-based economy, the laboratory is working on a number of projects centered around an advanced nuclear reactor. Such a reactor would operate at a temperature well in excess of the reactors that are currently in commercial operation and would be used to either pyrolyze natural gas or crack water in order to make hydrogen. It is predicted that this hydrogen will be needed to fuel both automobiles and homes in the near future. Specific projects in this area include development of processes for separating plutonium and fission products from molten salt, development of a process for reducing oxide fuels to metallic form, design of high temperature nuclear reactors, and development of chemical processes for efficiently converting hydrocarbons or water into hydrogen. This is a wide-ranging, multi-disciplinary project that requires the skills of nuclear, chemical, and mechanical engineers as well as physicists, chemists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists. APS:Advanced Photon Source
102-APS-1 : X-RAY SCIENCE DIVISION These activities include research in many areas of Chemistry, Materials Science, Magnetic Materials and Condensed Matter Physics as well as the development of instrumentation needed for a broad range of x-ray microscopy, scattering, spectroscopy, imaging, and time-resolved experiments in these fields to be performed at the Advanced Photon Source. In addition to research in many scientific areas, current activities are related to development of electronics for state of the art X-ray detectors, X-ray optics that allow focusing at the nanometer scale, novel synchrotron radiation instrumentation, and experimental equipment useful for various research applications. APS:Advanced Photon Source
103-APS-1 : BIOPHYSICS (BIO-CAT) Primary foci are on the structure of partically ordered biological molecules, complexes of biomolecules, and cellular structures under conditions similar to those present in living cells. Research goals include the determination of detailed mechanisms of action of biological systems at the molecular level. Techniques used include x-ray fiber diffraction, x-ray scattering, x-ray absorption/emissions spectroscopy, and diffraction enhanced imaging. Consortium includes Illinois Institute of Technology. APS:Advanced Photon Source
104-APS-1 : CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED RADIATION SOURCES (CARS-CAT) The consortium includes The University of Chicago, Northern Illinois University, Southern Illinois University, and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, and represents four national user groups: BioCARS for structural biology, GeoCARS for geophysical sciences, SoilEnvironCARS for soil/environmental sciences, and ChemMatCARS for chemistry and materials science. Techniques used include high pressure diffraction, microspectroscopy, microtomography, x-ray scattering, and crystallography. APS:Advanced Photon Source
105-APS-1 : DU PONT-NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY-DOW (DND-CAT) This facility is dedicated to advancing x-ray study on new materials. Foci include the study of the atomic structures of bulk materials, the study of two-dimensional atomic structures, and polymer science and technology. Techniques include imaging, crystallography, scattering, and tomography. APS:Advanced Photon Source
106-APS-1 : INDUSTRIAL MACROMOLECULAR CRYSTALLOGRAPHY ASSOSCIATION (IMCA-CAT) This consortium involves crystallographic groups from 12 companies in the United States with major pharmaceutical research labs, in association with the Center for Synchrotron Radiation Research at the Illinois Institute of Technology. A large fraction of the research is proprietary. Techniques include multiwavelength anomalous diffraction. APS:Advanced Photon Source
107-APS-1 : MATERIALS RESEARCH (MR-CAT) Illinois Institute of Technology is among four universities and one major corporation (BP-Amoco) involved with this collaboration. Foci includes studies of advanced materials in situ as a means of characterizing their structure and electronic properties, as well as understanding their preparation. Primary techniques include wide- and small-angle scattering, single-crystal and powder diffraction, absorption spectroscopy, reflectivity, standing waves, diffraction anomalous fine structure, and time-dependent and microfocus techniques. APS:Advanced Photon Source
110-BIO-1 : MEMBRANE PROTEIN ENGINEERING Membrane-bound proteins pose particular challenges for biochemical and biophysical studies. Our development of novel expression systems and stabilizing reagents for membrane proteins advances the potential for study of these highly specialized molecular systems. BIO:Biosciences Division
113-BIO-2 : BIOINFOMATICS FOR PROTEIN SCIENCE Several bioinformatics tools have been developed at the Biosciences division to support structural genomics and proteomics research, ranging from target design, surface survey of protein structures, to interpretation of mass spectrometry data BIO:Biosciences Division
114-BIO-3 : SUBSURFACE SCIENCE Subsurface science research focuses on investigations of fundamental biogeochemical questions pertaining to elemental tranformations and transport and global earth system model inputs. High-energy x-ray physics, environmental chemistry, environmental microbiology, and radiolimnology are used in an integrated program to determine the biotic and abiotic contributions to biogeochemical cycling in natural and extreme environments. The Advanced Photon source is used for analysis of biogeochemical transformations as well as whole cell imaging to determine the presence of a variety of metals. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> BIO:Biosciences Division
116-BIO-4 : MOLECULAR MECHANISMS RESPONDING TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE This project seeks to identify the molecular basis of cellular transport and sensory pathways that mediate the response to environmental nutrients. Our limited understanding of the function and biological role for transporter and sensor domain proteins is a principal impediment to defining nutrient exchange processes and signaling pathways that mediate response to environmental ligands and ecosystem changes. This program will address this knowledge gap by mapping transport and sensor proteins to specific environmental compounds to define their function and biological roles and establish a series of defined connections between the environment and the cell. BIO:Biosciences Division
120-CELS-1 : High Performance Computing Systems for Science and Engineering The Laboratory Computing Resource Center operates supercomputer clusters for science and engineering programs used by every research division at Argonne. LCRC's systems feature advanced processors (X86, GPU, etc.), high performance network fabrics, and a wide array of system monitoring tools, compilers, libraries, and application codes. High performace storage systems support large simulations and analyses. This project will pursue opportunities to develop and deploy new tools to improve system performance, monitor and control systems, and add new supercomputing capabilities. <br /> CELS:Computing, Environment and Life Sciences
121-CELS-2 : COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY The objective of this research is to develop, implement, and use computational tools and algorithms to understand the fundamental behavior of microorganisms, plants, and microbial communities. The current emphasis is on genome sequence analysis, omics data analysis, metabolic model reconstruction, and annotation optimization based on experimental data. We also develop user-friendly tools for querying and analyzing biological data. This includes web interfaces for data browsing and visualization, as well as web interfaces for apply complex analytical techniques. Visualization of biology network data (metabolic networks, protein-protein interaction networks, and regulatory networks) is a also a key challenge in our work. <br /> CELS:Computing, Environment and Life Sciences
122-CELS-2 : METAGENOME ANALYSIS Large scale sequencing of nucleic acid data generates novel insights into many areas of Biology, it also creates large data sets and poses many interesting computational challenges ranging from large scale data management to data mining in multi terabyte data sets. Application of tools is in ecology, environmental remediation and medicine. http://metagenomics.anl.gov. CELS:Computing, Environment and Life Sciences
123-CELS-2 : SYSTEMS BIOLOGY KNOWLEDGEBASE This research project revolves around the integration of diverse biological datasets and tools into a consistent interoperable computational framework. We are developing new analytical methods that integrate diverse datasets, and we are exploring new computational mechanisms for deploying tools and computation to a diverse and widespread community of biological researchers. Web service development, web interface development, database design and development, statistical analysis of biological data, and data analysis algorithm development are all keys aspects of this work. CELS:Computing, Environment and Life Sciences
124-CEPA-1 : SCIENCE WRITING Argonne's Communications & Public Affairs Division offers a summer science-writing internship for undergraduate students with a strong background in journalism and an interest in science. Interns work with a staff of professional writers and communicators to write science news and feature stories and magazine articles for internal and external audiences. <br /> <br />In addition to the standard application requirements, the following are requirements for the science writing internship: <br /> <br />1. Must be currently enrolled full-time at an accredited institution and completed at least sophomore year schooling with demonstrated competence in science writing; <br />2. Must have a demonstrated writing ability and an interest in science; and <br />3. Email three (3) writing samples to undergrad@anl.gov. Writing samples weigh most heavily in the selection process. We recommend stories and articles about science written for a public audience. This can include samples written specifically for this application or for classes, or writing published in newspapers, magazines or blogs (including student newspapers). Less recommended are write-ups for experiments, as these typically are written for a scientific audience in the passive voice. <br /> <br /> CEP:Communications, Education and Public Affairs
125-CIS-1 : SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) Systems administrators manage the architecture, implementation, and ongoing maintenance of Windows, Solaris, and Linux-based servers. Other facets of systems management including filesystems, storage area networks, backup technologies, and core Internet protocols including mail, DNS, web, and other services. Systems administrators provide the backbone for key applications to function in a highly available environment for Laboratory users. Internship opportunities exist to work with professional staff on evaluating new technologies, analyzing and upgrading existing systems, and developing management tools. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
126-CIS-1 : AUTHENTICATION TECHNOLOGIES - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) The ability to identify network users confidently is a fundamental requirement for distributed applications. Strong authentication enables sharing sensitive data across unsecured networks. Technologies such as LDAP, Kerberos, and public/private keys are used to provide alternate authentication strategies. Argonne actively works to incorporate technologies into UNIX and Microsoft environments. Internship opportunities exist to evaluate, develop, and test new and/or expanded authentication technologies. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
127-CIS-1 : HIGH-SPEED NETWORKING - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) High performance computing systems being planned currently have the potential to achieve a petaflop of computing power. If petascale systems can fulfill their promise and if software can scale to take advantage of these more complex systems, they will definitately change the nature of scientific questions that can be pursued via simulation in every scientific field. To support these initiatives effective high-speed networking will be an essential component. Argonne is active in the testing, monitoring, and tuning of high-performance networks. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
128-CIS-1 : LOCAL-AREA NETWORKING - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) Argonne has been striving to achieve an effective balance of both science and security within our campus network infrastructure. Networking projects include the deployment of a 10 Gigabit Ethernet backbone, high-performance data center infrastructure, wide spread wireless deployments, with a complimentary mix of cyber security measures – firewalls, vpn’s, and intrusion detection systems. With these efforts we are striving to provide in breed infrastructure for supporting scientific research. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
129-CIS-1 : CYBERSECURITY - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) The Argonne Cyber Security Program plays an integral part in maintaining the integrity and cyber wellbeing of the users and data on Argonne’s computer systems and networks. The office is responsible for the technical implementation and policy governance of the systems in place that protect the Laboratory. Activities of the office include Vulnerability Scanning and Tracking, Firewall configuration review, Intrusion Detection System (IDS) development, Scripting and Automation and administration of a lab wide detection infrastructure. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
130-CIS-1 : APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) Programmer/analysts interact with clients, design and develop or maintain computer programs, and conduct tests on the Laboratory’s business information systems. These systems may be stand-alone, multi-tiered client/server, and/or web-based applications. The Division is migrating to a Service Oriented Architecture using modern Web 2.0 technologies. Internship opportunities exist for students to work with professional staff on developing and upgrading real-world applications in the new paradigm. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
131-CIS-1 : TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) As part of its mission in operation support for the laboratory, CIS maintains a program of technology evaluation with potential for increased operation efficiency or new capability creation in support of the laboratory’s mission. Internship opportunities exist to work with CIS staff evaluating application of IT to a wide variety of operational needs (energy efficiency, automation, sensor and control systems, etc. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
132-CIS-1 : Service Management - (Program not available for Faculty appointments) ITIL-based IT Service Management (ITSM) processes are a key element to providing efficient and reliable services in support of the science that Argonne provides. Argonne employs the use of Service Now as the platform for implementing such processes to manage various aspects of service management to include Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition and Service Operation. ITSM process owners and their teams develop these processes, implement then and continually improve their processes throughout the process lifecycle. CIS:Computing and Instrumentation Solutions Division
149-CSE-1 : ATOMIC, MOLECULAR, AND OPTICAL PHYSICS This program is targeted at exploring the frontiers of x-ray sciences and laying the foundation for ultrafast x-ray applications. The research program takes unique advantage of the existing and upcoming accelerator-based light sources. The approach combines experimental and theoretical efforts. In the high-intensity limit, we aim at a quantitative and predictive understanding of x-ray interactions with matter. At the time-resolution frontier, we employ novel x-ray/x-ray pump/probe techniques to investigate molecular dynamics on time scales intrinsic to inner-shell processes. Combining optical lasers with x-ray probes allows us to exploit a high level of control in the initiation, guiding, and tracking of photo-induced dynamics of molecules in solution. In addition to conducting experiments at the Advanced Photon Source, Linac Coherent Light Source, and other x-ray facilities, we take advantage of massively parallel computing at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
135-CSE-1 : CHEMICAL DYNAMICS This program merges theoretical and experimental work on the energetics, kinetics, and dynamics of chemical reactions in the gas phase with particular emphasis on combustion reactions. Shock tube, flow tube, and photoionization techniques provide fundamental measurements on the high- and low-temperature kinetics of radical-radical and radical-molecule reactions, on the thermochemistry of radicals, and on vibrational/rotational selected photodissociation of small molecules. A comparable theoretical effort maps out potential energy surfaces by electronic structure techniques; follows the dynamics and kinetics on surfaces with trajectories, wave packets, and statistical models; and couples multiple processes together in kinetics simulations. The synergism between comparable experimental and theoretical efforts is a hallmark of this effort. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
136-CSE-1 : SOLAR CONVERSION Researchers are defining the basic principles in solar energy conversion that govern charge separation in molecules via the study of electron transfer reactions within natural and biomimetic photosynthetic structures. Work on the mechanism of charge separation in natural photosystems is being extended to construct novel artificial systems to mimic the natural process. The program approach features the resolution of structural dynamics linked to electron transfer reactions by the application of a suite of advanced, multifrequency, pulsed magnetic resonance, transient optical, and x-ray techniques to follow light-activated structural dynamics across multiple time (10-13 s to 1 s) and length (1 Angstrom to 500 Angstrom) scales. The research develops a fundamental understanding of structure-function relationships in biological photosynthesis and establishes principles for the design of biomimetic systems for solar energy conversion. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
137-CSE-2 : CATALYSIS Catalysis involves the development of a material or compound that increases the rate of a chemical reaction and/or increases the overall conversion of the starting material(s) to the desired product(s) but which itself is not consumed in the reaction. Catalysts come in one of two types: homogeneous catalysts in which the reactants and catalyst are in the same phase -– normally the liquid phase, and heterogeneous catalysts in which the reactants and catalysts are in separate phases –- normally gas or liquids for the reactants and solid for the catalyst. We have programs in both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis focused on understanding the catalytic properties of single-metal atoms and nanoscale metal particles isolated in either an oxide or polymer matrix for the conversion of small molecules such as methane or carbon dioxide to fuels or chemicals. A distinguishing strength of our research is the development of novel in situ techniques for studying chemical reactions under "real world" conditions using spectroscopic techniques such as x-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
138-CSE-2 : FUEL CELLS AND HYDROGEN Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are promising alternatives to conventional power systems for transportation, portable, and stationary applications due to their high efficiency for converting fuel to electricity, low emissions, and low operating temperatures. Three major issues that need to be addressed to promote the commercialization of PEFC systems are cost, lifetime, and hydrogen storage, particularly for automotive and portable applications. Our research activities focus on addressing these major issues, including projects aimed at: (1) reducing or eliminating the amount of costly platinum used in the electrocatalysts, (2) understanding the mechanisms and processes by which fuel cells degrade, and (3) developing novel new materials for storing hydrogen. A distinguishing strength of our research is the analysis of complex systems associated with fuel cell applications, hydrogen production, and hydrogen storage. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
139-CSE-3 : LITHIUM BATTERY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND ENGINEERING Argonne National Laboratory has been actively involved in the development of advanced batteries since the late 1960s when it initiated research and development on high-temperature lithium-sulfur batteries. In the early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established its first independent battery test facility at Argonne and named it the National Battery Test Laboratory for the purpose of conducting independent evaluations on advanced battery technologies that were potential candidates for use in battery-powered electric vehicles. Over the last 40 years, Argonne's battery program has evolved and expanded, becoming internationally recognized as a world-class center for lithium battery research and development. <br /> <br />Integrating Basic Research, Applied Research and Development, and Engineering: The current organization of Argonne's Electrochemical Energy Storage Research Theme includes a battery test group and five battery research and development groups. The battery test laboratory changed its name to the Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory (EADL), but it continues to provide DOE's transportation program and U.S. auto companies with the same type of independent evaluations, using standardized test protocols that the EADL helped to develop for DOE. The Research Theme's five research and development groups cover the lithium battery landscape from the basic science perspective to the engineering design of batteries for specific applications. This integration of basic research, applied research and development, and engineering has played a key role in Argonne's success. <br /> <br />The integrated capabilities of the Research Theme can be described using an example of the process that it employs to develop more optimal materials and cell chemistries for a specific application. When existing cell chemistries suffer from life, inherent safety, or performance limitations, detailed diagnostic and electrochemical cell modeling studies are used to identify the limiting factors, and new materials are developed to overcome these limitations. These can be new electrode materials with enhanced structural, chemical, electrochemical, and thermal stability that are designed (with the aid of ab initio modeling) to increase specific capacity, extend life, and/or enhance inherent safety. Additionally, with the aid of quantum mechanical modeling, electrolyte additives with the proper redox potentials and physicochemical properties are developed to help stabilize the electrode/electrolyte interfaces. These new materials are thoroughly characterized and compared with existing materials to provide assurance that they will help stabilize cell chemistry. Once the characterization work and preliminary aging studies verify enhanced stability, the materials are produced in sufficient quantity to allow thorough evaluations in hermetically sealed cells, which are produced in Argonne's Cell, Analysis, Modeling, and Prototyping (CAMP) Facility. Argonne employs its detailed battery design model to develop the electrode design specifications, and the CAMP Facility coats electrodes and produces cells. These hermetically sealed cells are then subjected to extensive accelerated aging and abuse tests to quantify the improvements relative to a baseline cell chemistry. Results from detailed diagnostic and modeling studies on these cells, including examination by the Post-Test Facility, are then used to further refine and optimize the materials, if needed. Using this process, Argonne has developed a large portfolio of intellectual property on advanced materials that is available for licensing by the battery industry and its material suppliers. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
140-CSE-4 : HEAVY ELEMENT AND SEPARATIONS SCIENCE Basic science research of heavy element and fission product atomic- and molecular-scale chemistry with focus on actinide aggregation in solution and precipitates, metal-ligand interactions, and electronic properties. Researchers are using novel instruments at the Advanced Photon Source to elucidate the electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinide nanoclusters, providing new insights into their behavior in separations processes and their migration in the environment. In related studies, they are designing, synthesizing, and characterizing chelating agents for metals separations and recovery. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
141-CSE-4 : INTERFACIAL PROCESSES Basic science research of mineral/water interactions to advance the fundamental understanding of geochemical processes important for understanding transport of elements in the near surface environment (e.g., for geological repositories). Additional projects probe liquid-solid interfaces associated with energy storage technologies such as batteries and electrochemical capacitors. Researchers are deploying advanced in-situ x-ray spectroscopy and imaging techniques to explore mineral surface hydration, ion adsorption structures, and mineral growth and dissolution processes. CSE:Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division
163-ESQ-1 : INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE Industrial Hygiene provides sitewide guidance and technical support for assessment and control of workplace exposures to chemicals and physical agents, excluding ionizing radiation. Exposures to solvents, gases, vapors, dusts, and mists are measured using a variety of direct-reading instruments and personal sampling devices which collect samples from workplace air for laboratory analysis. Other activities involve exposure surveys for indoor air quality, noise, ultraviolet light and microwaves, selection, fit testing and user training of respiratory protective devices, and particle collection efficiency measurements of high-performance air-cleaning systems. A wide variety of instrumentation is used, including infrared, electrochemical cell and photoionization type gas and vapor monitors, aerosol photometers, data loggers, noise and microwave meters, and instruments for collecting and measuring airborne nanoparticles. <br /> Projects are available concentrating on a specific aspect of industrial hygiene. ESQ:Enviroment, Safety and Quality Assurance
164-ESQ-1 : ESH TRAINING This section designs, develops, and presents training on environment, safety, and health (ESH) issues throughout the Laboratory. Training classes, courses, and programs respond to various DOE, EPA, OSHA, federal, and state regulations, as well as identified environment, safety, and health training needs. Design, development, and implementation of training may involve work lab-wide with subject matter experts. Varied training needs provide multiple opportunities to undertake creative approaches to instructional design and performance technology as well as technology-based training solutions. Curriculum design, course design, and the associated front end work that incorporates needs analysis, determination of entry characteristics and behaviors, development of performance objectives, and creation of instructionally sound testing mechanisms are used. Evaluation of training programs, courses, means of instruction, and instructor competence are facets of ES&H Training. As a research and development facility, Argonne provides a setting that encourages innovative technology-assisted training approaches. These include the design, development, testing for efficacy, and application of Computer-Based Training (CBT) and Web-Based Training (WBT) strategies involving creative software applications as well as participation in the design and development of Argonne specific software programs. Projects include significant concentration on utilization of the Web, and effective optimization between databases. ESQ:Enviroment, Safety and Quality Assurance
165-ESQ-1 : RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY Radiological Protection Program supports nuclear and radiological research and accelerator operations to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation. Students with interests in the physical sciences, electronics, and mathematics may find career-enhancing opportunities in the field of radiological safety and protection, also known as health physics. [Further information on the growing field of health physics is also available at http://www.hps.org/ ]. Student opportunities available in the Argonne Radiological Protection Program include work with radiation detection and monitoring equipment as well as direct involvement in radiation safety support of work in nuclear and radiological laboratories and accelerators. ESQ:Enviroment, Safety and Quality Assurance
166-EVS-1 : CLIMATE CHANGE RESEARCH Field studies and modeling are emphasized. GLOBAL CHANGE studies use observational facilities in the Southern Great Plains to study processes that are important in climate modeling. Improved subgrid-scale parameterizations are developed for the structure of the planetary boundary layer and the air-surface exchange of heat, moisture, and solar and infrared radiation. REMOTE SENSING from the ground uses Doppler acoustic, radar, and laser systems along with in situ observational systems to study the structure of the planetary boundary layer and to evaluate the transport and dispersive properties of the lower atmosphere above complete terrain. Satellite data on optical radiance reflectances from land surfaces are used to study energy balances and the corresponding biological properties that affect energy flows. For WATER and BIOCHEMICAL CYCLE studies, heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide fluxes, nitrogen deposition and fluxes, as well as soil moisture content, are evaluated over large terrestrial areas with models, and results are compared to local observations made in the field sites located at Southern Great Plains and Fermi Lab. NUMERICAL MODELS are developed and applied to study the structure of planetary boundary layer as it affects energy flows, meteorological conditions, and the transport and dispersion of trace chemicals. EVS:Environmental Science Division
167-EVS-1 : ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES The Division evaluates construction and operation of energy technology systems and other industrial activities to assess their potential impacts on ambient air quality, climate, meteorology, and the acoustic environment. The effectiveness of control technologies and related government regulations in mitigating these impacts are also evaluated. Air-quality databases and new and improved methods of modeling air pollutant emissions, environmental transport and transformation processes, and noise propagation are developed as part of this work. Models are developed and performance evaluations are conducted to address emerging health and safety issues and to give environmental managers additional information on uncertainty in model predictions for consideration in formulating national and international energy and environmental policies. In addition, hazard analyses and risk and consequence assessments are performed to determine the impacts from possible releases of nuclear, chemical and biological agents. Recent projects have provided guidance to government agencies in hazard analysis, risk management, emergency response, and pollution prevention and control. EVS:Environmental Science Division
168-EVS-1 : ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY We are studying the chemical transformations and fates of energy-related air pollutants released into the atmosphere over urban and regional areas for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Science Program. This program focuses on determining the regional and global climatic effects that result from radiative forcing of the atmosphere by aerosols. Our limited comprehension of aerosol effects prevents us from understanding how energy use will affect future climate. Some topics of investigation include: <br />• Measurement of aerosol profiles using remote sensing instruments, such as Micropulse LiDAR in conjunction with measurement of vertical profiles of relevant atmospheric dynamic variables such as wind temperature and stability of the planetary boundary layer. <br />• Use of numerical models of atmospheric chemistry and transport to interpret and generalize the findings from the observational studies. <br />• Use of numerical models to evaluate the uncertainty in calculating the radiative forcing from aerosols. <br />• Develop better-constrained models for evaluating the uncertainty in calculating the aerosol radiative forcing using data assimilation methods and models. <br /> EVS:Environmental Science Division
169-EVS-1 : APPLIED ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT The assessment of contamination problems at federal facilities and the evaluation and implementation of tailored cleanup methods and technologies play an important role in the Division’s activities. Extensive environmental analyses and remediation studies are conducted to support cleanup and environmental restoration work at contaminated sites. The Division analyzes health and environmental risks and management alternatives designed to address different site wastes and contaminants in air, soil, surface water, groundwater, biota, and structures/equipment. Innovative technologies and regulatory impacts on waste management and environmental remediation options are also analyzed. These analyses, which are used for remedial investigations, baseline risk assessments, and feasibility studies, often extend to the development of sampling and remedial design strategies; these combined evaluations rely on integrated data analyses and atmospheric, hydrogeologic, ecological, and health modeling and analyses. In addition, pollution prevention and material disposition studies emphasize improved waste. EVS:Environmental Science Division
170-EVS-1 : COMPUTATIONAL HYDROGEOLOGY/HYDROLOGY Analytical and numerical models of surface flow, groundwater flow and solute transport are developed, assessed, and applied by the Division to support water resources analyses in various settings. The Division uses sophisticated models to understand the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants in the subsurface in support of environmental remediation work. Watershed-based methods for simulating large-scale hydrologic systems have been developed to support the evaluation of impacts of biomass/biofuels production and climate change on water quantity and quality. Extreme event evaluation (e.g., flooding scenarios) is used to assess the vulnerability of sensitive facilities such as nuclear power plants to natural disasters. Regional scale hydrologic models are used to assess the effects of large-scale energy development projects on public lands and natural resources. Divisional hydrology work relies on advanced tools sets such as geostatistics, advanced scientific visualization, graphical database, multi-media, and virtual reality techniques to prepare, analyze, and communicate the results of these studies. This area is multi-disciplinary and taps a wide range of skills and knowledge available within the Division. EVS:Environmental Science Division
171-EVS-1 : APPLIED GEOSCIENCE AND REMEDIATION FIELD RESEARCH Argonne’s research program in applied geosciences and environmental management is improving the characterization and remediation of contamination in complex geologic and hydrologic media through innovations in advanced sampling and analysis, restoration of natural systems, performance monitoring for in-situ remediation systems. Remediation strategies to treat chlorinated volatile organic compounds in soils and groundwater are developed and implemented that are uniquely tailored to each individual site, with a focus on “green” and innovative technologies. Specialized monitoring programs are then designed to investigate and optimize the functional aspects of each technology, as well as the remedial impacts achieved in the subsurface environment. Technologies currently in field application in Nebraska, Kansas, and Missouri under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, include (1) contaminant volatilization by spray irrigation equipment, with beneficial reuse of the treated water; (2) phytoremediation; (3) microscale application of carbon-enhanced zero-valent iron; (4) coupled large-diameter boreholes, soil vapor extraction, and air sparging to clean up soil sources; and vapor intrusion detection and mitigation. EVS:Environmental Science Division
172-EVS-1 : ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS SCIENCES The Division analyzes the effects of both natural processes and human activities on aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems, ecological communities, plant and animal populations, threatened and endangered species, and cultural resources. Impacts examined include hydrologic alteration, habitat effects, land disturbance, ecological effects of radiological and chemical contamination, and related cumulative impacts. Ecological risk assessments are performed for contaminated sites to support the development of ecological cleanup criteria and the evaluation of remediation alternatives. Mitigation or management strategies such as ecological restoration are developed to reduce impacts and enhance ecosystem function. Information is gathered through field and laboratory studies, remote sensing, and literature searches, and is analyzed using statistical techniques, modeling, and geographic information system (GIS) approaches. Recent projects have examined the effects of dam operations on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, have evaluated biodiversity and habitat, have assessed ecological risks at contaminated sites, and have assessed wetland and prairie restorations. EVS:Environmental Science Division
174-EVS-1 : NATURAL RESOURCES SYSTEMS ANALYSIS Natural resource management plans are prepared for federal facilities to identify goals and objectives, commonly over five-year periods, to guide planning and implementation of various federal programs. The Division takes an integrated approach in developing these plans for specific federal agencies, by examining planned facility missions and programs, the current baseline physical and natural environment, and potential impacts associated with the given program. Program activities are considered together with objectives within such natural resource areas as fish and wildlife management, forestry resources, federal and state protected species, recreational programs, wetland resources, waste management and cleanup, and adjacent land use. Integrated natural resource management plans are then used to develop detailed operational plans that typically describe specific tasks, associated labor effort, cost, and final products anticipated by implementing the tasks to meet overall plan objectives. Other focus areas include evaluations of transportation risks, risks to the ecosystem, probabilistic environmental risk assessments, cumulative risks to natural resources from combined impacts of multiple contaminants, and natural resource risk communication. EVS:Environmental Science Division
175-EVS-1 : ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT The Division assesses potential impacts of proposed federal actions in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and related environmental requirements. These NEPA analyses evaluate the baseline (no-action) situation as well as the environmental consequences of a given proposed action (which can be project-specific or programmatic) and its alternatives. This assessment of potential impacts to the human environment extends across natural and ecological resources to social and cultural resources and health effects. Potential impacts are analyzed and presented in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, and other documents prepared by the Division. Activities include conducting public involvement activities and responding to issues of public concern, examining regulatory issues, gathering and evaluating information and data, developing databases and multi-media tools, retrieving and archiving information, and developing management tools. These activities are performed by closely integrated multi-disciplinary teams tapping expertise across the Division. (See the other technical areas.) EVS:Environmental Science Division
176-EVS-1 : RISK ASSESSMENT Risk assessment is a key element of many Division projects and is used to guide a broad variety of environmental decisions that extend from managing contaminated sites to planning and preparedness for homeland security. The scope covers a wide range of technical, environmental, and human health issues in various settings, from urban areas to remote facilities. These assessments are conducted by teams that integrate across all of the Divisions’ technical areas, and they address both radionuclides and chemicals under different types of controls and release events. The assessments support multiple decisions over time, from short-term consequence management to intermediate cleanup actions and long-term control and sustainability. For these assessments, the Division has developed an extensive set of analytical tools and approaches to assess the sources of risk and specific hazards involved, evaluate the potential incidents (e.g., releases) and related exposures that could harm people or the environment, and assess the nature of the risks that could be incurred. These analyses consider the mechanisms and pathways by which humans or ecological/ environmental receptors could be exposed to hazards from the facilities, areas, or activities being assessed, as well as the outcome of those exposures, considering acute to chronic effects, including risks from exposures to mixtures and cumulative risk analyses. The Division also promotes risk communication and educational outreach, including through risk assessment training and health-related fact sheets for chemicals and radionuclides found at many DOE sites, many of which are also important to homeland security. EVS:Environmental Science Division
177-EVS-1 : RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT Using analytical methods formulated within the Division, radiological analysis software is being developed by the Division for use nationally and internationally. An example of software developed is the RESRAD Family of Codes (web.ead.anl.gov/resrad/home2/). Most of the software also includes probabilistic analysis capability for studying parameter uncertainty. Input data sets needed to use the software are also compiled and default parameter distributions are included for typical applications. The software tools are coded in Fortran, Visual Basic, and C languages with user-friendly interfaces and follow stringent quality assurance standards. Impact to animals and plants from exposure to radionuclides in the environment is an emerging research area, and the assumption that 'if humans are protected then animals and plants are also protected' is being challenged in many applications. The Division is developing Dose Conversion Coefficients for assessing radiological doses to nonhuman biota (animals and plants). Transfer coefficients from environmental media (soil, water, sediment) to biota are also being collected. A software tool named RESRAD- BIOTA developed by the Division is the first of its kind available for radiological biota dose assessment. EVS:Environmental Science Division
178-EVS-1 : THE ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MEASUREMENT CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded scientific user facility the provides five highly instrumented world-wide ground stations, two mobile facilities, and an aerial facility for the study of global change. While research at this facility focuses on the role clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s climate, research also includes the study of alterations in climate, land productivity, oceans or other water resources, atmospheric chemistry, and ecological systems that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. These data are available for use by students and guest faculty for climate studies at Argonne (www.arm.gov). EVS:Environmental Science Division
179-EVS-1 : VISUAL IMPACTS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY FACILITIES EVALUATION AND MITIGATION Realization of the potential contribution of utility-scale solar, wind, and other renewable energy resources requires that potential impacts be identified and mitigated to the extent possible. Because of their large size and highly reflective surfaces, utility-scale renewable systems may be visible for long distances and may contrast strongly with the natural or rural landscapes in which they are often located. Stakeholder concerns about the potential visual impacts of utility-scale renewable energy facilities are a major factor in slowing or halting land-based wind energy projects, and are emerging as potential issues for both offshore wind energy and solar energy facilities in the United States. Argonne's Environmental Science Division is conducting a series of field-based research projects to characterize the visual impacts of utility-scale wind, solar, and electric transmission facilities under a variety of landscape, seasonal, weather, and lighting conditions, and to identify strategies for mitigating the visual impacts. These efforts are currently focusing on facility siting on public lands in the western United States and on waters of the Outer Continental Shelf. In a component of the research in the southwest United States, the visibility of large utility-scale parabolic trough facilities and a small power tower solar facility has been investigated as a potential source of aesthetic impact on national park units, wilderness areas, historic and scenic trails, residential communities, and other sensitive areas. A similar project investigating wind energy impacts seeks to determine the maximum visibility distances for commercial wind turbines in both day- and night-time viewing, and the viewing distances where visual contrast levels become a major factor in creating visual impacts. EVS also is developing a geographical information system (GIS)-based Visual Impact Risk Assessment and Mitigation Mapping System (VIRAMMS) for (1) developing visual impact risk maps for areas under consideration for wind energy development and (2) identifying location-specific visual impact mitigation measures and best management practices (BMPs) to avoid or reduce potential visual impacts associated with wind energy development. EVS:Environmental Science Division
180-EVS-1 : ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS Many of the Division’s activities involve the development of advanced software tools. These tools are used for a variety of purposes – archiving large environmental data sets, performing risk assessments, modeling environmental processes such as groundwater flow, managing public comments for Environmental Impact Statements, visualizing complex 4D data sets, and constructing sophisticated Web portals for user communities and the public. The Division leverages open source software to the extent possible and is incorporating high performance computing techniques and resources into its software development work. The Division maintains a critical mass of software programming expertise that includes systems engineers, database specialists, graphical user interface designers, and software engineers. EVS:Environmental Science Division
181-EVS-1 : GEOSPATIAL ANALYTICS AND TECHNOLOGIES Almost all of the Division’s work involves collecting, managing, analyzing, and/or communicating information with spatial dimensions. The area of geospatial analytics and technologies represents a rapidly changing field with emerging technologies and trends that have significant implications for the types of basic and applied research the Division performs. Besides the core Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool sets typically used for cartography, the Division is active in remote sensing data acquisition and analysis, the development of Web-based portals for disseminating maps and spatial data, the integration of modeling tools within a GIS framework, and spatial data analyses including geostatistics. Examples of emerging areas for the Division include: 4D modeling of urban landscapes; advanced positioning systems to support data acquisition, surface mapping, and location determination; augmented reality for communicating complex geospatial data sets; social media analyses and voluntary participatory science; adaptive sensor network designs; and high performance computing/”Big Data” applications within geospatial analytics. EVS:Environmental Science Division
182-EVS-1 : TERRESTRIAL ECOLOGY Terrestrial systems ecology research includes studies of plant-microbe-soil-atmosphere interactions and biogeochemistry at molecular to landscape scales, with specific emphasis on the belowground ecosystem. Research projects focus on belowground responses to environmental change, improving knowledge of terrestrial components of the global carbon cycle, factors influencing sustainable production of bioenergy crops, and characterizing the quantity and potential vulnerability of carbon sequestered in the organic matter of permafrost-region soils. EVS:Environmental Science Division
183-FMS-1 : FACILITIES ENGINEERING SERVICES This activity consists of performing functions as an engineering assistant in the Facilities Infrastructure Group. These activities include working with one or more engineers from various Engineering disciplines, i.e. mechanical, electrical, environmental, structural, civil, pressure systems, building energy, renewable energy, sustainability and/or architectural. Work will include engineering support of buildings, facilities, utilities and site systems as related to planning, construction, modifications, maintenance, operations and/or regulatory compliance. Tasks may include engineering surveys, studies, field work, design assistance, data collection, database management, review and preparation of specifications/diagrams/reports, quality assurance, safety reviews, configuration management, and investigation into engineering problems. This position is a support function that does not conduct scientific research. FMS:Facilities Management and Services Division
184-GSS-1 : ADVANCED MUTLIDISCIPLINARY SIMULATION The Division develops, promotes, and utilizes advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and technologies for both research and operational applications. These tools facilitate the construction of complex, heterogeneous simulations that integrate modeling representations of many diverse dynamic processes across time and space to address difficult problems that require multidisciplinary solutions. Representative recent and ongoing projects include: <br /> <br />* Simulation frameworks for the study of the stability and sustainability of societies under stress due to such factors as climatic, economic, energy and technological change and political turmoil. A pilot study involves constructing detailed socioecological simulations of representative villages and sub-regions in rural Southeast Asia. <br /> <br /> * Diverse applications in computational linguistics, multinational law enforcement, ocean physics, health and welfare of disadvantaged children, and many others. <br /> These projects tend to have an inherently synergistic, integrative focus that provides research opportunities for computer-literate investigators with interests and expertise in a wide variety academic disciplines. GSS:Global Security Sciences
185-GSS-1 : INFRASTUCTURE ASSURANCE The Division has worked to develop Argonne as the lead laboratory for infrastructure protection with the Department of Homeland Security. <br />The Division’s infrastructure expertise is supported by a large suite of models, simulation tools, extensive databases, and planning tools that include: <br /> * Regional resiliency assessment and resilient cities initiatives <br />* Security and resilience assessments of critical infrastructure <br />* Climate change adaptation planning <br />* GIS-based gas supply system database <br />* Gas and electricity energy supply systems modeling and simulation <br />* Toolset to analyze the condition of gas supply systems <br />* Comprehensive U.S. electric supply system database <br />* Infrastructure analysis in gas, oil, electricity, telecommunications, transportation, and water <br />* Identification and quantification of impacts from infrastructure interdependencies GSS:Global Security Sciences
186-GSS-1 : INFORMATION SCIENCES The Division develops architectures and systems that organize and integrate large-scale, complex, and heterogeneous information. The systems include: <br /> * Data warehousing tools, such as intelligent query visualization to provide context for information retrieval <br /> * Develop and enhance the information network for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility <br /> * Develop petabyte-scale scientific data access and storage solutions for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN GSS:Global Security Sciences
187-GSS-1 : Integrated Analytics The Division develops and applies theoretically-grounded, but practical, integrated (e.g., hybrid and multi-paradigm) analytical methodologies including: <br />* Simulation methods and models; <br />* Data science software and applications; and <br />* Methodologies and technologies for integrated analytics. <br /> GSS:Global Security Sciences
188-GSS-2 : EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS The Division has considerable expertise in emergency preparedness and planning for technology-related accidents, terrorist attacks, and other emergencies. Current topics include: <br /> * Provide emergency preparedness expertise to FEMA, DOE , DOT and the U.S. Army <br /> * Develop emergency preparedness system for use in subways to detect chemical agent attacks and provide first responders with crisis management information <br /> * Develop GIS-based Special Population Planner to identify and locate populations and facilities needing special assistance in emergency situations <br /> * Develop Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix (ERSM) to assist in creating an integrated response plan involving multiple (federal, state, local) jurisdictions GSS:Global Security Sciences
189-GSS-4 : BIO-DETECTION TECHNOLOGIES - MICROBIAL FORENSICS Utilizing various bacteria we generate a multi-dimensional forensic signature indicative of the growth conditions and the equipment employed during culture identifying the technical expertise and infrastructure of the operator. Different growth conditions result in altered protein signatures even in identical strains. We have identified changes in protein signatures resulting from variations of medium composition, temperature, duration of culture, and purification methods. The high resolution protein signatures obtained from our method should provide the depth of information necessary for fermentor attribution. Our solution combines existing technologies into a stand-alone system utilizing basic biochemical techniques performed in standard laboratories. GSS:Global Security Sciences
191-GSS-1 : BIO-DETECTION TECHNOLOGIES - FOOD TECHNOLOGY Characterization of food products has become increasingly important to the food industry. We are developing methods addressing the high throughput requirements of this industry. Applications include food authenticity to speciate and identify origin, characterize biofilms, identify food allergens through serology, determine effects of gamma irradiation on proteins and identify markers indicative of meat quality. GSS:Global Security Sciences
193-GSS-1 : CYBER OPERATIONS, ANALYSIS, AND RESEARCH To ensure the resilience of U.S. infrastructure, it is essential that networks associated with infrastructure assets are protected against increasingly frequent cyber attacks. Argonne's Cyber Operations, Analysis and Research (COAR) team develops and implements the tools and provides the expertise to conduct extensive network analysis to support federal agencies, military sponsors, and commercial organizations in efforts to improve the security and resilience of their network design and operations. COAR is seeking candidates interested in exploring cutting edge research in the field of cybersecurity, specifically focused on the needs and special problems of critical infrastructure protection. Specific topics include critical infrastructure sector analysis, moving target defense, defensive and offensive techniques for botnet protection and infiltration, dependency and interdependency visualization, augmented reality technology for first responders, satellite cybersecurity, CANbus and VAnet attack and defense, big data analysis and visualization, machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithm development and application, encryption technology, and social engineering. GSS:Global Security Sciences
403-GSS-1 : SUPPLY CHAIN MODELING Division researchers are developing a dynamic agent-based model of critical and strategic material markets and supply chains. The models include regional interacting agents at all stages in the supply chain from mining to final products. The agents in the model are represented by attributes and decision behaviors, derived from economic and market theories, for pricing, purchasing, production, sales, technology choice, and inventory management. Model results will inform strategic material assessments and policies. Project tasks include: <br /> <br />* Research specific supply chains with the objectives to derive methods and compile data to effectively model them. <br />* Analyze model projections of future prices, supply, and demand of strategic material markets. <br />* Develop methods to effectively visualize and communicate model results and associated uncertainties. <br /> GSS:Global Security Sciences
194-HEP-1 : SENSOR AND DETECTOR DEVELOPMENT Instrumentation is the enabler of science, both pure and applied and the development of instrumentation, based on new incremental or transformational technology is critical for the advancement of science. Promising new cost-effective detector technologies are increasingly likely to come from combining research advances from other fields such as materials science, nanotechnology, and semi-conductor technology with the expertise and development needs of particle physics. The Argonne High Energy Physics Division has a growing effort in the development of advanced sensors and detectors to establish a scientifically broad-based and coordinated instrumentation R&D program to produce new detectors using novel instrumentation with enhanced capabilities at significantly reduced cost. This development provides overlap between scientific divisions to expedite the sharing of beneficial instrumentation research and technology and its scope covers other programs supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, particularly Nuclear Physics and Basic Energy Science and, where appropriate, National Security and Medical applications. <br /> <br />A major project within the division is the development of a basic family of economical robust large-area photo-detectors that can be tailored for a wide variety of applications that now use photomultipliers. The Large-Area Picosecond Photo-Detector project (LAPPD) uses glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) substrates functionalized using the technique of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and conventional photo-cathode technology adapted to large area. The goal is to provide an all-glass 8"x8" planar photodetector, which has the potential to be economical. The photodetector is read out with anode strip lines and the signals are processed with a waveform digitizer with a sampling rate of 17 GHz. Tests indicate that sub-millimeter position resolution and around 50 ps timing resolution is easily achievable. The photodetectors can be tiled to form supermodules providing an economical path to construct very large area photodetectors. <br /> <br />A highly segmented hadron calorimeter as part of a new concept of imaging calorimeters being pursued to enable the physics at a future lepton collider has also been developed. In this context, a highly segmented hadron calorimeter using Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active medium of the calorimeter was built and operated. The prototype detector has a transverse granularity of one cm2 pads read out with fully embedded front-end electronics. The prototype section underwent detailed testing in the Fermilab test beam with steel absorber plates and is now being tested at CERN with Tungsten as absorber. The measurements provide the most detailed images of hadronic shower development to date and will provide stringent tests of current hadron shower models. <br /> <br />Combining the expertise in the Materials Science Division and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, the division has in the last three years designed and built from scratch the Transition Edge Sensors to measure the 90 GHz Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. These sensors were deployed during the 2011 austral summer on the South Pole Telescope experiment and are able to measure the extremely small polarization anisotropies in the CMB signal. The group has recently embarked on an ambitious program to develop multi-chroic sensors sensitive to three millimeter-wave passbands and be polarization sensitive. The fabrication of low-loss superconducting microstrips is key to this development. <br /> <br />Another area of research is the development of a fast pattern trigger for real time analysis of nanosecond time scale phenomena for particle astrophysics experiments and collider experiments such as the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The group is committed to explore the potential of the 3D, vertically integrated silicon technology for this application. In this context the group is also exploring the development of radiation hard optical modulators to provide the community with high throughput communication devices that will make large data volumes available, nearly instantaneously, for first-level processing. <br /> <br />In collaboration with the Nano Science Technology Division we are exploring the potential of novel 2d materials. 2d materials are atomic mono-layers, of which the most well-known example is graphene. There are many other 2d materials, however, such as phosphorene and more generally trans-metal dichalcogenides. These materials allow band-gap engineering and hold the promise for fabrication of very low power systems. A program is being set up in collaboration with the LEAST center at Notre Dame university to characterize 2d materials <br />and study their applicability for device fabrication. <br /> <br />The vertically stacked silicon technology, also called 3d silicon, is being aggressively pursued by industry. With this technology, integrated circuits are thinned to a thickness of a few microns and bonded together, while ensuring good electrical connection between the layers. This technology allows for the fabrication of powerful, highly efficient application specific integrated circuits that can be directly combined with a radiation sensor. The division is currently testing such a 3d device. It consists of a silicon sensor for the detection of charged particle trajectories, combined with a 2-layer integrated circuit. The integrated circuit is only 35 microns thick. A robust characterization and development program to apply this technology to the next generation of vertex detector for collider experiments is being carried out. <br /> <br />Modern day tracking experiments use monolithic active pixel sensors as active medium. The charge collected in these devices is rather small, because the silicon cannot be depleted. A new program studying HV-CMOS detectors has been started to study the feasibility of this technology for collider experiments such as ATLAS or CMS, or experiments at an International Linear Collider. <br /> <br />Other highlights of our R&D program are the study of various types of anomalies found in the charged-coupled device (CCD) technology which is the basis for many types of instrumentation and detectors used in scientific research, commercial applications, the medical field, and optical and UV spectroscopy and the development of a topological trigger for the VERITAS experiment. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
195-HEP-1 : NEUTRINO EXPERIMENTS Experimental neutrino physics is focused on the measurements of mass and other properties of neutrinos that may have profound consequences for understanding the evolution of the universe. Over the last few decades, particle physicists have accumulated experimental evidence on the properties of major constituents of matter, including neutrinos, to explain how neutrinos interact with matter and how these ghostly particles propagate over long distances. We have discovered a phenomenon of neutrino oscillation, a quantum mechanical effect that is possible only if neutrinos carry masses and mix among themselves. <br /> <br />Why is this important? With precise knowledge of neutrino mixing, it is now possible to start using neutrinos as a tool to understand why the universe is built from matter rather than antimatter -- one of the fundamental questions of the universe. The idea is to create beams of neutrinos (i.e. particles) and anti-neutrinos (i.e. anti-particles) and measure its mixing properties with detectors away from particle sources. <br /> <br />Argonne has been a leader in neutrino physics from the development of the twelve foot bubble chamber in the 1970s, and through the creation of NuMI beam for the MINOS experiment. Physicists at Argonne National Laboratory have had important roles in discoveries of neutrino oscillation and measurements of mixing parameters. Examples of recent involvement include MINOS and Double Chooz experiments, and the current NOvA (NuMI Off-Axis ve Appearance) experiment. <br /> <br />Neutrino physics is the dominant motivation for the next round of HEP facilities in the US. After NOvA probes neutrino CP-violation and neutrino mass-hierarchy, we plan to perform the final precise determination of these quantities with the DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) experiment, planned to start after the end of the NOvA operation. <br /> <br />Recent experimental data, which show that neutrinos have a mass, are forcing theorists to revise the Standard Model of particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider is a great success of particle physics, but the Higgs boson may not be enough to explain the hierarchy of fermion masses and the smallness of neutrino masses. A list of important questions in neutrino physics, not in any particular order, include: What are precise values of oscillation parameters? Do neutrinos violate CP symmetry and if so, by how much? What is the hierarchy of neutrino masses? Is there a sterile neutrino? What are the absolute values of neutrino masses? Is the neutrino its own anti-particle? Can we detect Big Bang relic neutrinos? Is the neutrino a component of dark matter? <br /> <br />Understanding neutrino physics is imperative for finding out the relationships between the neutrinos and other elementary particles, particularly when it relates to their relative masses. Because making direct observations of neutrino masses is so difficult, we must use neutrino oscillation experiments and neutrino-less double-beta decay searches to get a better sense of the characteristics of these mysterious particles. <br /> <br />There are opportunities for students and faculty to be involved in the simulation and analysis of data for these experiments, to work on detector development for future neutrino experiments, and to help to plan the best experimental program for the far future. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
196-HEP-1 : EXPERIMENTS USING POLARIZED BEAMS The Argonne group is working at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) on spin experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In the past, we were involved in the design and construction of an electromagnetic calorimeter and a forward tracking detector for one of the large RHIC detectors (STAR). Present tasks include analysis of data collected with STAR and the electromagnetic calorimeter. We also maintain one of the AGS polarimeters for use by RHIC accelerator physicists (the AGS injects beams into RHIC). The primary physics issues that will be studied at center of mass collision energies from 200 to 510 GeV are: 1) the spin content of the proton, including measurements of the gluon and sea quark helicity distributions; 2) checking of the electroweak couplings, including parity violation in W+/- production; and 3) measurements with transversely polarized beams. To achieve these physics goals, there will be detection of jets, pi0s, direct photons, and electrons from W+/- decays; the electromagnetic calorimeter and new tracking detectors will play crucial roles in these measurements. HEP:High Energy Physics Division
197-HEP-1 : ATLAS EXPERIMENT AT CERN The ATLAS experiment (see http://atlas.ch/) is located at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (http://home.cern/), the European Organization for Nuclear Physics, near Geneva, Switzerland, where it is investigating the behavior of matter, energy, space and time, and the smallest distance scales ever studied. This is achieved by colliding two protons at the record-breaking energy of 13 tera-electronvolts, and measuring the properties of such collisions in two huge detectors, ATLAS and its sister detector CMS (http://cms.web.cern.ch/). In 2012, together with the CMS experiment, ATLAS discovered the Higgs boson. <br /> <br />Argonne has played major roles in ATLAS: in the hadronic calorimeter, elements of the trigger, and the data handling for the unprecedented data volumes that are produced in the course of the experiment - and distributed worldwide. We also operate a regional center (one of four in the United States) for ATLAS physics analysis. This center hosts workshops and visitors, provides a computer cluster for data analysis and has several meeting rooms equipped for participation in internet-based meetings. The group also work in the areas of detector and software development for upgrades to the ATLAS Detector at the High Luminosity LHC, including the upgrade of the tracking system to use fine pitch sensors based on silicon technology, the trigger system to enable higher rates of collisions to be used for physics analysis, in software development to enable the effective use of high performance computing on machines similar or greater in class to the Blue Gene Mira, and in physics and performance studies to prepare for this huge increase in data. <br />Argonne physicists' lines of investigation include studying Quantum Chromodynamics (the behavior of quarks and gluons), electroweak symmetry breaking and in exploring the properties of the Higgs boson. Members of the group are also engaged in searches for physics beyond the standard model such as supersymmetric particles, event characteristics suggesting whether or not large extra dimensions exist, and searches for new physics in boosted systems. More details on these activities, on the analyses carried out by members of the Argonne group and on the contributions of Argonne to the detectors systems can be found at: http://atlaswww.hep.anl.gov/group/. <br /> <br />We provide opportunities for students and faculty to get involved with physics analysis, computer simulation of physics processes, and tracking and electronics detector development as part of our R&D program for the high luminosity upgrade. Opportunities are also available to participate in the development of core software, data infrastructure, and metadata systems that are central to physics data processing and to software development for future Argonne flagship computers. <br /> <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
198-HEP-1 : ADVANCED ACCELERATOR R&D The Advanced Accelerator R&D program at Argonne is focused on advancing the physics and technol¬ogy of beams, particularly new approaches to beam acceleration and instrumentation important to the broad U.S. high energy physics program, such as the development of new techniques for accelerating electron beams to high energies. <br /> <br />The Advanced Accelerator R&D Group (“the group”) at Argonne operates the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility and performs world-class pioneering research on beam-structure interaction, such as beam- and rf- driven acceleration concepts. Our past major accomplishments include: the first ever demonstration of collinear wakefield acceleration in dielectric devices, plasmas, and disk-loaded structures; the first ever direct measurement of transverse wakefields in linac structures, including the NLC prototype design; generation of ultrahigh current electron beams, unique among RF photocathode based linacs; production and measurement of high accelerating gradients in both plasmas and dielectric structures; and origination and demonstration of the principle of the two beam acceleration using dielectrics; first ever high-power testing of dielectric accelerating structures that lead to the discovery of a new multipactoring phenomena; and first ever observation of Schottky enabled photoelectron emission in an RF photocathode gun with possible application for high brightness electron beam generation. <br /> <br />The AWA also serves as a user facility. A few notable examples of past collaborative efforts include: the Tesla Test Facility photoinjector test with FNAL; non-linear plasma wakefield experiment with UCLA; coherent Cherenkov and transition radiation experiments with JPL and UCLA; positron source measurements with APS; etc. We have also received recent requests to do advanced accelerator physics related experiments using the AWA facility. For example, University of Maryland, Yale / Omega-P, Euclid Techlabs, and Muons Inc have already scheduled experiments related to beam diagnostics and advanced acceleration schemes. Several other institutions are currently developing plans for experiments to be performed at the AWA. <br /> <br />The group’s strengths and activities include: accelerator research in areas that require intense, short-pulse electron beams; development of advanced accelerating structures; dielectric-based wakefield acceleration in structures; generation of high-power rf using dielectric lined waveguides or other types of slow wave structures; and enabling tech-nologies of photocathode-based electron sources necessary to produce high-brightness electron beams. The group has also generated important conceptual design strategies for future linear colliders, and has had a leading role in the design of positron beamlines (generation, capture and transport) for ILC and CLIC. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
199-HEP-1 : MECHANICAL SUPPORT GROUP The Mechanical Support Group (MSG) consists of a staff of engineers, designers, engineering assistants, and technicians who design and construct experimental components and the equipment. In recent years the Mechanical Support Group has participated in the construction of Zeus, CDF, the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter, the STAR detector at RHIC, and the Near and Far Detectors at MINOS and NOvA, DES, Double Chooz, and CTA. The Mechanical Support Group has a wide range of technical skills such as the ability to perform detailed finite element analysis, solid modeling, detailed design drafting, fiber optic experience, mechanical fabrication, mechanical testing of materials and structures, and designing of machinery. The strength of the MSG is its ability to interact with physicists, develop designs, and then follow through with prototyping and construction. HEP:High Energy Physics Division
200-HEP-1 : ELECTRONIC SUPPORT GROUP The Electronic Support Group consists of a staff of engineers, software professionals, engineering assistants, and technicians who design and construct electronic instrumentation used in scientific research both at Argonne and at experimental facilities world-wide. In recent years the Electronic Support Group has participated in the construction of Zeus at DESY in Hamburg, Germany, CDF and MINOS at Fermilab, ATLAS at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, the STAR detector at Brookhaven, and the VERITAS telescope Array in Arizona. The group has a wide range of technical skills including low-noise analog design, sophisticated digital design including programmable logic, wireless RF and fiber-optic data transmission, low-voltage and high-voltage power supply design, printed circuit board design, and software development supporting test stands. Our projects include prototyping, one-off developments, and projects with hundreds or thousands of read-out channels. We work closely with physicists, scientists, other engineers, and computer professionals to develop specialized instrumentation for scientific research. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
201-HEP-1 : THEORY The Theory Group is helpful in establishing the experimental program of the High Energy Physics Division at ANL and maintains close contact with colleagues in the various ANL HEP experimental groups. As a whole the most noteworthy recent contributions or the Theory Group are on Higgs physics. The cross sections and uncertainty estimates for Higgs production used by both the Tevatron and LHC collaborations in their searches were derived by Argonne personnel. Theorists at Argonne examine the discovery and exclusion reach of the Tevatron and LHC colliders in different production and decay channels in the Standard Model and beyond. With the recent discovery of a Higgs-like resonance with mass of about 125~GeV, they are active in determining the properties of beyond the Standard Model scenarios that can lead to an explanation of the observed signatures, including some Higgs production rates that currently seem to deviate from the Standard Model predictions. They also study new methods for looking for the Higgs boson, as well as for the determination of the Higgs boson properties, like spin and parity, and the possible differentiation of the Higgs from other look-alike particles. <br /> <br />The Theory Group contributes significantly to our understanding of the intricacies of QCD and its effects on hadron collider observables. Argonne theorists devise novel methods for the calculation of cross sections to high orders in perturbation theory, and closed long-standing loop-holes in the factorization proofs that provide the foundation for all hadron-collider predictions. They investigate double parton scattering" in which two hard scatterings occur in a given proton-proton collision at the LHC, and developed new parton distribution functions that incorporate the possibility of a light gluino as a hadronic constituent. They also work on solving the observed discrepancies between theory and experiment in the exclusive production of two quarkonia at the B factories. Moreover, they provide theoretical predictions and simulation codes used by all Tevatron and LHC experiments in their study of the electroweak gauge bosons, and contributed numerical codes to LHC experiments in their search for same sign top pairs. <br /> <br />HEP Theorists also work actively in model-building motivated either by new theoretical ideas or by attempts to provide interpretations of unexpected experimental results. These include the forward-backward asymmetry of the top quark, and the reported dijet excess in the production of a W plus two jets. They also analyze the possibility of explaining anomalies in direct and indirect dark matter detection, and study ways to identify the properties of a dark matter particle. Finally, the Theory Group analyzes models that could lead to understanding of baryogenesis, the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. Argonne HEP Theorists also work on formal aspects of physics, and they have made significant progress in defining Renormalization Group functional equations and Quantum Mechanics in phase space. <br /> <br />The HEP Theory Group has a long tradition of successfully mentoring young students and postdocs. Members of the group hold joint positions with nearby Universities, which has created new opportunities for students to collaborate with Argonne HEP staff during their Ph.D. studies. Most of the recent postdoctoral fellows at the Argonne HEP Theory Group have remain in the field and have acquired faculty positions in prestigious research institutions all around the world. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
202-HEP-1 : EXPERIMENTAL ASTROPHYSICS & COSMOLOGY The experimental Astrophysics and Cosmology program at Argonne studies the nature of the missing 95% of universe that is not understood. The missing matter and energy is typically called dark matter and dark energy, and is the one of the most intriguing and challenging mysteries in science today. Understanding the effects of these dark components on astrophysics and cosmology involves the construction of large telescopes, development of specialized sensors, and the design of electronics to readout and record the data, as well as advanced analysis techniques and simulations across a wide range of photon wavelengths. The experimental astrophysics and cosmology HEP program includes a Dark Energy program with an optical astronomy component working on the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), a mm-wave galaxy cluster survey using the South Pole Telescope (SPT-SZE), a GeV-TeV cosmic gamma-ray program working on VERITAS, and a Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) program in studying the polarization of the CMB using the South Pole Telescope (SPTPol experiment). <br /> <br />The Dark Energy program is heavily involved with DES which emerged as the DOE's experiment as proposed by the Dark Energy Task Force. The official 5-year DES survey began August, 2013. The ANL DES group is heavily involved in a program of supernova science, including the analysis of supernova candidates from DES, and simulations of the future LSST supernova survey. The ANL DES group led the PreCam project, a mini-DES camera which was installed on a 1m-class telescope near the DES camera and observed 200,000 calibration stars. We are currently working on a futuristic infrared-astronomy camera using 1.5 micron ring resonator filters fabricated at the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials. These filters are meant to remove sky background lines and reduce the exposure time needed by 1000. <br /> <br />The cosmic gamma-ray program is currently involved with VERITAS which studies very high energy gamma rays produced from exotic particles like dark matter. VERITAS has been collecting data since spring 2007 and Argonne has focused on DM analysis of the current and ongoing data and led the analysis of the first VERITAS indirect DM limits result using dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The experiment just completed an upgrade which included a new camera with high QE PMTs and a new L2 trigger. The trigger has been developed by Argonne together with Iowa State University. ANL is also part of CTA and is leading the mechanical design of a new dual mirror telescope being developed by the US CTA group. Argonne together with ISU are developing a fast real time trigger based on multiple telescope event topologies for CTA. <br /> <br />The CMB group is involved with the SPTpol experiment which measures the polarization of the CMB at the level of 10-100 nK to investigate inflation -era physics and constrain the mass of neutrinos. The ANL group developed new Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers in collaboration with the ANL Materials Science Division and Center for Nanoscale Materials and installed these new sensors on the SPT in the winter of 2011/2012. First light was in early 2012 and the experiment plans to collect data through 2016. The CMB group is planning to develop multichroic sensors and upgrade SPTpol in 2016. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
203-HEP-1 : COSMIC FRONTIER THEORY An astonishing 99.6% of our Universe is dark. Observations indicate that the Universe consists of 70% of a mysterious dark energy, 25% of a yet unidentified dark matter component, and only 0.4% of the remaining 5% of ordinary matter, is visible. Understanding the physics of this dark sector is one of the most challenging problems in fundamental physics. <br /> <br />In order to investigate the nature of dark energy - the central focus of cosmological sky surveys - it is mandatory to disentangle the expansion history of the Universe, as captured by the Hubble expansion rate, from the growth of structure as seen in the evolution of the distribution of galaxies – the cosmic web. These two aspects have to be probed with a suite of powerful measurements ranging from clusters of galaxies, redshift space distortions, baryonic oscillations in the clustering of galaxies, and lensing cosmography. The large-scale structure of the Universe also contains within it information about the number of relativistic species and the sum of neutrino masses. Precision measurements allied with accurate theoretical predictions are now being used to set constraints unavailable from terrestrial experiments. On smaller scales, the nature of dark matter (such as interaction cross-sections and initial velocity dispersion) can also be probed by the distribution of matter on smaller scales, such as those characteristic of dwarf galaxies. Finally, the physics of the early Universe can be probed by studying the nature of the primordial fluctuations in the microwave background and in the galaxy distribution itself. <br /> <br />The cosmic frontier theory effort at ANL focuses on precision cosmological probes of dark energy, dark matter, inflation, and neutrino physics. The majority of these probes are concerned with tracking the dynamics of structure formation and the associated initial conditions as determined by the physics of the early Universe. The work is closely connected to ongoing and next-generation sky surveys across multiple wavebands. The group has membership ties to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). In addition, group members also work on modified gravity, the quantum-classical transition, time-evolution of quantum fields, application of advanced statistical methods, statistical inverse problems, and nonlinear dynamical systems. <br /> <br />A key enabling role in the group's effort is played by Argonne's supercomputing resources and expertise available at the ALCF and in MCS Division, as well as other national facilities. ANL is the lead Laboratory for the SciDAC-3 project, Computation-Driven Discovery for the Dark Universe, a collaboration involving 6 national laboratories and university partners. <br /> <br />Recent highlights of work done in the group include (i) the development of the HACC (Hardware/Hybrid Accelerated Cosmology Code) simulation framework. HACC, a Gordon Bell Award finalist for 2012, is a very high-performance cosmic structure formation code suite that scales to the largest supercomputers available today, independent of their architecture; (ii) work on the quantum stability of chameleon field theories, alternatives to general relativity, where it is shown that almost all such theories will have large quantum corrections in order to evade experimental bounds; (iii) a detailed study of the bispectrum of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, now accessible to high-resolution cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations; (iv) mass reconstruction of clusters using a particle-based lensing method that combines information from weak and strong lensing; (v) an investigation of the predicted profiles of (dark matter dominated) galaxy clusters as compared to a number of recent observations -- finding good agreement; and (vi) an adaptive method for characterizing the cosmic web structure of the Universe, including multi-stream regions, using a new tessellation technique. <br /> <br />Opportunities for students and faculty include: analysis of cosmological simulations and data, theoretical work on dark energy and alternatives to general relativity, exploration of cutting edge supercomputing architectures, databases for cosmological simulations, physics of the early Universe, and large scale structure probes of dark energy. <br /> HEP:High Energy Physics Division
204-HEP-1 : Precision calibration of Nuclear Magnetic Probes for the Muon g-2 experiment The new Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab will precisely determine the anomalous magnetic moment, g-2, of the muon, the big cousin of the electron. This quantity is very sensitive to virtual particles and is therefore a very good probe in detecting new physics and particles. The experiment uses muons stored in a 45-m long ring magnet and requires the determination of both the spin precession of the muons and the measurement of the magnetic field. As we are aiming at the very challenging precision of a few parts in a billion (ppb), the key is in understanding tiniest detector effects that could distort the result. <br /> <br />At Argonne National Laboratory, we are responsible for measuring the magnetic field. For that purpose, we have established a former hospital, human MRI magnet that will be used to precisely characterize and calibrate our Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes. We will need to compare the field measurement of different probes and determine the influence of external parameters such as bias voltages or temperature. This project will include the development of the proper hardware setup to precisely align the probes and perform the calibration measurements. The recorded NMR signals need to be analysed and hence suitable analysis algorithms need to be written (e.g. fits of the time spectrum, Fourier transform methods). Variation of the external parameters in a controlled way will further lead to the understanding of tiny effects at the tens of ppb level. The project offers hands on experience with hardware, software and analysis. HEP:High Energy Physics Division
205-IAD-1 : PHYSICAL SECURITY The Field Intelligence Element (FIE) is the Department of Energy’s Intelligence Communities (IC) national security arm focused on keeping the United States safe from terrorists and foreign aggressors. The FIE needs to maintain a level of security in order to meet national security mission requirements. The selected student’s role will be to research and create mitigating strategies to IC Directives and other security related tasks as assigned to meet national security standards. TS/SCI clearance is preferred. <br /> IAD:Intelligence Analysis Division
206-I3-1 : The Integrated Imaging Initiative (I3) The Integrated Imaging Initiative (I3) is dedicated to the advancement of imaging science and its application to cutting-edge research. Current focus areas for the I3 include multimodal imaging, imaging data science, and advanced modeling and simulation. These activities include modeling of x-ray and electron physics; simulations of complex coupled models; development of algorithms for tomographic reconstruction, and phase retrieval; advancements of multimodal techniques; in situ data analysis and visualization; high performance computing. III:Integrated Imaging Initiative
207-I3-1 : Electron Ptychography This project as a part of the I3 initiative is focused on the high resolution imaging of magnetic nano-objects using electron microscopy. The goal is to achieve a “lens-less” imaging system that can circumvent the limitations of lenses in electron microscope to achieve a theoretical resolution of close to a picometer. This will be achieved by reconstructing the object wavefunction using Ptychography. Participants responsibilities will include working with simulated electron microscopy images and applying the ptychography routines developed by the researchers in the MCS division to perform object wavefunction reconstructions, analyze the data, participation in discussions of the results, and establishing protocols for experimental imaging. Participants will have the opportunity to learn and use parallel computing for image simulation and reconstruction, and give presentations of their research results. <br /> <br /> III:Integrated Imaging Initiative
208-JCR-1 : Joint Center for Energy Storage Research Mission Support This activity consists of performing functions as a assistant to the Mission Support Group of the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) Energy Innovation Hub. JCESR aims to go beyond today’s best Li-ion systems to provide five times the energy density at one-fifth the cost within five years. The specific activities include working under the supervision of the JCESR Business Operations Manager and alongside the mission support leads, performing work related to the Seven Core JCESR Mission Support Functions including: Finance, Human Resources (HR), Information Technology (IT), Communications, Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH), Infrastructure Planning, and Project Management/Controls, Work will include providing operational support of the JCESR mission of "discovery of new energy storage chemistries through an atomic-level understanding of energy storage phenomena and the development of universal design rules for battery performance” by contributing in these seven core functions. Tasks may include compiling data for project reporting (stakeholder management), encouraging the JCESR Safety Culture by developing ESH awareness communication content, enabling JCESR communication and outreach by compiling communication collateral & web content, tracking operational performance metrics (finance and project controls), developing and implementing project deliverable tracking mechanisms, developing mission support processes and procedures, and a variety of general support tasks in support of the seven core functions . This position is a support function that does not conduct scientific research. JCR:Joint Center for Energy Storage Research
209-LCF-1 : COMPUTING FACILITIES, SUPERCOMPUTING Aurora is the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s next big advancement in supercomputing. Designed in collaboration with industry leaders Intel and Cray and operated in support of open science as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Leadership Computing Facility, Aurora is a next-generation system for computational science and engineering. <br />  <br />Aurora exists for the exclusive use of the scientific and engineering research community—a global and growing community whose unbounded curiosity drives the breakthroughs that benefit humanity the most. From finding alternative energy sources to treating diseases to developing high-tech materials—the research done on leadership-class machines yields the world’s biggest technological advancements. These machines also serve to advance our understanding of our physical world, visible and invisible, the terrestrial and to galaxies far beyond our own. <br />  <br />Aurora will deliver more than eighteen times the computational performance of Mira, its predecessor at the ALCF, using a nearly equal number of compute nodes. Aurora will be a many-core system—but with nearly an order of magnitude more processors. <br />  <br />Running machines of this scale, and with unique architectures, raises challenges in administration, operation, and the system software stack. Opportunities are available for students interested in systems administration, storage administration, system software development, and system tools development. <br />  <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). <br /> LCF:Argonne Leadership Computing Facility
210-LCF-1 : COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS FOR PETAFLOP ARCHITECTURES AND BEYOND This project aims to determine the applications and performance tools required to optimize systems utilization at the petaflops and larger scale. The project scope includes an emphasis on software and performance monitoring challenges at extreme scale. <br /> <br />Working with a suite of applications of strategic relevance to the Laboratory and DOE, specific efforts include evaluation of the computation and I/O scalability properties of each application’s mathematical model, devising methods for porting these codes to systems such as IBM’s Blue Gene, and development of system-level benchmarks based on these codes. Project participants will gain considerable understanding of leading-edge computer architectures, scalable applications and their use, and performance tools on petaflops and larger systems. <br /> <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). <br /> LCF:Argonne Leadership Computing Facility
211-LCF-1 : SCALABLE DATA ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION Data analysis and visualization can efficiently extract knowledge from scientific data. As computational science approaches exascale, however, managing the scale and complexity of the visualization process can be daunting, and there is a critical need to assist scientists with intelligent algorithms that save the most important data and extract the knowledge contained therein. <br /> <br />One approach that our team is investigating is the execution of more of the analysis and visualization pipeline concurrently on leadership machines. This work lays the foundation for in situ analysis to become more widespread and more tightly integrated with computation. In conjunction with large-scale parallel analysis algorithms, we are investigating novel workspaces for scientists to engage their data using first-person perspective, interactive navigation, and binocular 3D vision within the scientists' everyday work environment as an interface to scientific discovery. <br /> <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). LCF:Argonne Leadership Computing Facility
212-LCF-1 : INTERACTIVE INFOGRAPHICS AND ANIMATIONS FOR GENERAL AUDIENCES The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is looking for creative graphic artists and animators to help us tell exciting science and engineering stories to a general audience. The students’ goals will be to apply their curiosity and passion for the work, along with the fundamentals of graphic arts and visual rhetoric, to help create a connection to the receivers of our messages. <br /> <br />There are three areas we would like to develop: 1) the interactive explanation of scientific visualizations produced on ALCF's supercomputing resources, 2) visualizations of how things work such as job submissions for the underlying Blue Gene hardware, and 3) infographics on key demographic and statistical data in the ALCF data warehouse. <br /> <br />This project will certainly use advanced 3D applications and leverage a web-based, animation development environment. The students in this project will be provided with advanced, Mac-based tools and a vast supply of data resources. In addition, they will be working alongside staff and scientists to tease out the core ideas within the science and engineering efforts at ALCF. Finally, the students will be provided mentoring and coaching. <br /> <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). LCF:Argonne Leadership Computing Facility
213-LCF-1 : BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE AND ANALYTICS APPLIED TO A SCIENTIFIC FACILITY In today's business world, data analytics and business intelligence efforts bring customer and project data to everyone in an organization. If implemented correctly, these rich tools enable all staff to gain a deeper understanding of the core business metrics and take actions to improve the metrics. <br /> <br />A particular challenge in business intelligence is taking flat, specific reports and bundling the data contained in these reports into multi-dimensional data cubes. These cubes must be tailored to specific groups within the organization so they can render existing reports from the cubes. However, the ultimate goal is to present this data so that new reports can be generated without the intervention of a "database expert." <br /> <br />It's not enough to understand how to write code and craft database queries. The team working on this must fundamentally understand the customer and the goals of the organization and help keep the connection between them strong. Today's competitive landscape (in both profit and non-profit work) demands a more integrative, "user experience"-based method in tool development. <br /> <br />The students who take on this challenge will need to draw against broad skills. Programming skills are as important as understanding the scientific workflows and core business of ALCF. Students will be provided training in basic and advanced features of Pentaho, an open-source business intelligence and analytics systems. Students will be mentored by staff reporting to leaders across a high-touch IT organization. <br /> <br />For more information, see the ALCF website (http://www.alcf.anl.gov). LCF:Argonne Leadership Computing Facility
214-MCS-1 : EXTREME COMPUTING Designing, building, and improving extreme-scale computing systems provide many exciting challenges in operating systems, programming models and verification, performance tuning, fault tolerance, communication libraries, scientific software engineering, and new computer architectures.  The Extreme Computing area strives to find efficient and creative ways to dramatically improve the nation’s scientific computing capabilities.  Our research teams lead many internationally recognized projects that bring together computer scientists, applied mathematicians and computational scientists to explore these research areas. http://www.mcs.anl.gov/group/extreme-computing <br />DIVISION: MCS <br /> <br /> MCS:Mathematics and Computer Science Division
215-MCS-1 : DATA-INTENSIVE COMPUTING Growth in computer power is being dwarfed by a tremendous increase in data. Genome sequencing data alone has increased by more than 100,000 percent in less than six years. Large-scale simulations are producing petabytes and even exabytes of data that simply cannot be handled effectively or in a reasonable time by traditional methods. Managing this data tsunami is one of the most pressing challenges of our time. In MCS, we are tackling this challenge by developing new techniques for storing and analyzing extremely large datasets, building new systems for managing complex scientific workflows; and together with DSL, we are developing and applying advanced data science and machine learning methods to challenging problems in science and engineering. Our collective aim is to enable researchers to make use of their big data for big science, leading to new discoveries and breakthroughs. <br />http://www.mcs.anl.gov/group/data-intensive-science <br />DIVISIONS: MCS, DLS MCS:Mathematics and Computer Science Division
216-MCS-1 : APPLIED MATHEMATICS Work in Applied Mathematics ranges from formulation of rigorous theory, to algorithm design and deployment in portable software, to development of software tools and technology, to advanced simulations in applications of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy on leading-edge computing platforms. We explore three main areas and their interactions: (1) new approaches for mathematical modeling and numerical simulations to study complex multiphysics, multiscale phenomena that arise in scientific and engineering problems, focusing on PDE and ODE solvers, discretizations, uncertainty quantification, and stochastic approaches; (2) state-of-the-art techniques that fully exploit high-performance and beyond-Moore computing and lay the groundwork for new scientific insights, including automatic differentiation, verification, and performance modeling, tuning, and productivity; and (3) algorithms and models for analysis, design, decision, and control problems that incorporate novel data fusion, machine learning, optimization, statistics, and uncertainty quantification methodology.  <br />http://www.mcs.anl.gov/group/applied-mathematics  <br />DIVISION: MCS <br /> <br /> MCS:Mathematics and Computer Science Division
217-MCS-1 : SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS Much of our research in algorithms, libraries, and tools is motivated by challenges in science and engineering applications. Our computational scientists develop new models and codes and carry out investigations in such disciplines as climate science, cosmology, engineering diagnostics, materials science, nuclear reactor simulation, and metabolic modeling.  We also collaborate with computer scientists, computational scientists, and mathematicians to apply our new software tools and techniques in large-scale applications. For example, our PETSc software package has been used in more than 700 applications worldwide. Argonne is in the early stages of preparing and optimizing many scientific and engineering applications (and related software environments) to run on Aurora 21, an exascale computer with a novel architecture. Computational scientists are pursuing numerous projects in collaboration with domain scientists that will define the first set of exascale calculations. Our goal is to provide the means to push the envelope in science using emerging extreme-scale platforms. <br />http://www.mcs.anl.gov/group/science-engineering-applications  <br />and https://www.alcf.anl.gov/projects/aurora-esp <br />DIVISIONS: MCS, CPS <br /> MCS:Mathematics and Computer Science Division
218-MSD-1 : EMERGING MATERIALS The Emerging Materials group explores the fundamental science of complex materials that exhibit collective electronic, magnetic and structural behaviors, with an emphasis on low-dimensional oxide, chalcogenide, and pinched systems. We also pursue design and crystal growth of new materials for gamma radiation detection. Current and planned research plans concentrate on exploration of 5d oxides where spin-orbit coupling and electron correlation compete, phase competition and short-range order in correlated 3d oxides, new geometrically frustrated magnets, superconductors, topological materials and quantum critical materials. Synergy between properties measurement and materials synthesis stands as the cornerstone of our activity. We employ both exploratory and targeted synthesis to expose new science in both unknown and previously-discovered materials. Our high-quality crystals grown by zone, flux and vapor transport methods drive our local research and are in high demand worldwide. Key characterization techniques include magnetism, transport, electronic and diffraction studies both locally and at DOE user facilities. MSD:Materials Science Division
219-MSD-1 : MAGNETIC FILMS This group prepares and characterizes ultrathin films and related magnetic nanostructures with novel properties. The goals are to explore ultra-strong permanent magnets made possible via nanotechnology, and spintronic device concepts and prototypes that could become important as the semiconductor electronics roadmap for miniaturization reaches its limits in the foreseeable future. The materials are prepared as surfaces, interfaces, heterostructures, superlattices, and patterned array structures using molecular-beam epitaxy, sputtering, lithography and self-assembly techniques. Characterization techniques include ultrahigh-vacuum electron spectroscopies and diffraction, optical spectroscopy, magneto-optic Kerr effect, magnetometry, magnetotransport, scanning probes, and x-ray diffraction. Participants aid in the preparation of the nanostructures, and analysis and modeling of physical properties. Data handling via computer is usually part of the assignment. <br /> <br /> MSD:Materials Science Division
220-MSD-1 : APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY This research concentrates on improving the current carrying capacity of commercial high-temperature superconductors (HTS). It addresses materials modification and fundamental scientific issues that affect the end uses of these materials for targeted applications. Activities involve the irradiation of commercial HTS wires with high-energy ions to introduce controlled defects into the materials and characterizing them with low temperature and high field magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. In addition, we use large-scale Ginzburg-Landau computer simulations of vortex dynamics to elucidate and ‘predict’ the types of mixed defect landscape that can be created to optimize the current carrying capacity of these HTS wires. <br /> MSD:Materials Science Division
221-MSD-1 : BASIC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY This program focuses on experimental and theoretical investigations into the physics of a wide class of magnetic and novel superconducting materials. Current activities involve characterizing the electronic and thermodynamic properties of high temperature and multi-band superconductors, hybrid ferromagnetic magnetic and superconducting heterostructures, synthesis and characterization of magnetic and superconducting nanowires and wire networks, and exploration of vortex physics in mesoscopic superconductors. Experimental techniques include high field/low temperature magneto-transport measurements, micro-calorimetry, low-temperature/high-field scanning probes, magnetization measurements with micro-Hall probes, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID), high-resolution magneto-optics to visualize magnetic flux motion in real time, and measurements of the magnetic penetration depth using tunnel diode oscillator techniques. Participants will be involved with a variety of measuring techniques and instrumentation, and learn through hands-on experience the fundamentals of experimental condensed matter physics. MSD:Materials Science Division
222-MSD-1 : NEUTRON AND X-RAY SCATTERING Members of the Neutron and X-ray Scattering Group pursue diverse multidisciplinary research programs that combine MSD’s strengths in materials synthesis, characterization, and theory with state-of-the-art probes of the structure and dynamics of materials at major neutron and x-ray scattering facilities. A strong theme that permeates much of the group’s research is the effect of phase competition on material properties, whether arising from the delicate balance of competing interactions within bulk complex oxides or proximity effects in artificial heterostructures. When scientific goals are hindered by limitations in existing instrumentation, the group has a strong tradition of developing new techniques that extend the capabilities of the field, and members play a lead role in the development of novel instrumentation and techniques at the Advanced Photon Source and the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MSD:Materials Science Division
223-MSD-1 : SYNCHROTRON STUDIES OF MATERIALS The Synchrotron Studies of Materials group focuses on the use of cutting edge synchrotron x-ray techniques to advance the development of new functional materials. The group develops novel x-ray experimental techniques that take advantage of the unique capabilities of the latest x-ray sources, and applies those techniques to obtain fundamental understanding of key topics essential for the efficient, scientific development of new materials. A current focus is developing coherent x-ray scattering techniques to study materials dynamics using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and to image nanoscale features of functional materials during operation using coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Through a combined in situ x-ray / computational theory approach, the group also works to fundamentally understand and thereby control defect behavior in oxide thin film heterostructures. The effects of interfacial proximity on defect behavior and the resulting electrochemical properties are currently explored using in situ synchrotron x-ray studies controlled environments, complemented by first-principles simulations and multiscale computational theory. MSD:Materials Science Division
224-MSD-1 : CONDENSED MATTER THEORY Projects are available in a variety of areas involving analytical and numerical simulations of condensed matter systems. Past participant projects included studies of various properties of superconductors (microscopic and phenomenological theories, high temperature superconductors, vortices, etc.), electronic structure and properties of strongly correlated metals (including analysis of spectroscopic data), quantum critical and heavy fermion physics, and mesoscopic science (properties of quantum wires and quantum dots). Participant responsibilities include analytical solution of models, programming and running simulations, data analysis, and participation in discussions of their scientific implications. Participants will have the opportunity to use supercomputers and parallel processors. MSD:Materials Science Division
226-MSD-1 : DIRECTED ENERGY INTERACTIONS WITH SURFACES This program focuses on fundamental studies of the interaction of directed energy sources such as energetic ions, electrons, and photons with materials. It has at its core two integrated activities: 1) A fundamental understanding of energetic ion- and laser-solid interactions, and 2) The development of world-class trace analysis instrumentation. The interaction of directed energy sources such as energetic ions, electrons, and photons with surfaces provides the basis for modifying, patterning and analyzing materials. This program investigates the fundamentals of these complex interactions over a range of conditions using several unique, world-class instruments developed in our laboratory. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) combined with fine-focus ion and electron sources and lasers achieves high sensitivity and high elemental discrimination at high lateral resolution, allowing for detailed studies of directed energy surface interactions. Additionally, the instruments and methods are applied to problems such as in-situ trace analysis of solids, elemental and isotopic analyses of stardust grains and solar wind coupons, and high resolution lateral and depth profiling of nanostructured materials. MSD:Materials Science Division
225-MSD-1 : PROXIMITY EFFECTS IN CHARGED OXIDE HETEROSTRUCTURES This program utilizes in situ synchrotron x-ray studies of complex oxide thin film synthesis and heterostructure behavior in controlled environments, complemented by first-principles simulations and multiscale computational theory to reveal the effects of interfacial proximity on defect behavior and resulting electrochemical properties. In recent years, it has become clear that many of the remarkable properties discovered in the field of complex oxide heterostructures may be related to charged defects and their behavior at interfaces. Such phenomena, however, remain poorly understood due to the inherent difficulties in probing defect-interface interactions at the atomic-level and in the environments relevant to defect evolution. We address this problem by growing heterostructures with precise cation ordering and variable oxygen concentrations, enabling the systematic investigation of defect formation and migration behavior both during synthesis and while processing in different electrochemical environments. Throughout this program, the atomistic results are fed back to computational theory to gain insight into the mechanisms and the electronic and energetic processes taking place during defect structure evolution. Through this combined in situ x-ray / computational theory approach, our ultimate goal is to form a knowledge-basis of defect behavior, which will be analyzed for the discovery of descriptors that can enable large-scale predictions of interface-dependent defect transport kinetics and provide new insight for the design and synthesis of materials with tailored, tunable, and multifunctional defect-engineered properties. MSD:Materials Science Division
255-MSD-1 : DOMAIN BEHAVIOR IN FERROIC MATERIALS The behavior and properties of ferroelectric and magnetic heterostructures are dependent on the behavior of their domains, i.e. on the way in which domains form and move as a function of an applied field. In turn the domains and their dynamics are controlled by the microstructure and composition of the films through interactions with features such as grain boundaries, defects, the presence of interfaces, and of confinement between bounding layers of the heterostructure. Further control of domain structure and dynamics can be achieved by lateral confinement, for example via patterning to produce 3-D nanostructures. The aim of this program is to develop a clear understanding of how the structural/defect properties of such materials affect their magnetic and electric response. This is being done through in-situ studies of local domain structure and dynamics combined with microstructural and elemental analysis, and with in-situ TEM studies of local tunneling characteristics. The program makes use of in-situ transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering techniques at two of Argonne’s user facilities to explore the domain behavior in magnetic and ferroelectric thin films and heterostructures. Examples of problems that are being addressed are the interactions between magnetic nanostructures patterned into arrays, the role of surface environment on domain formation in ferroelectric films and the interaction of ferroelectric domain walls with defects in thin films. MSD:Materials Science Division
226-MSD-1 : COSMO CHEMISTRY We use laser-based mass spectrometry to study how atoms are made in stars, and to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of the sun. The isotope ratios of elements in stardust grains hold clues to stellar nucleosynthesis - the nuclear processes that make and transform atoms in stars. These grains were made in stars that lived and died before the sun was born, and have been trapped in primitive meteorites ever since the solar system formed. They are pristine samples of the original material from which the Earth and planets were made. We also analyze samples of the solar wind collected by NASA’s Genesis spacecraft. The Genesis mission exposed high purity collector materials such as silicon wafers to the solar wind. High velocity ions streaming out of the sun implanted into the wafers, which were returned to Earth. These samples record the isotopic and elemental composition of our own star - the sun. These two samples, stardust and solar wind, tell different stories. Stardust grains are samples of individual stars that contributed material to the solar system; the solar wind is a mixture of all the material that went in to forming the solar system. MSD:Materials Science Division
227-MSD-1 : PHYSICS OF GRANULAR AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS Our research includes innovative experimental and theoretical investigations of the wide range of phenomena at the frontier of condensed matter and biological physics: flows of granular materials, dynamic self-assembly of micro and nano particles, and more recently, organization collective behavior of various biological objects, such as molecular motors, microtubules, bacteria. Experimental techniques include a variety of high-speed, fluorescent, phase contrast, dark field video microscopy, and the state-of-the art image processing of experimental video data. Theoretical studies include computer modeling of dynamic processes of self-organization, and molecular dynamics simulations. Participants will be involved with a variety of microscopy and experimental image processing techniques, bio sample preparations, and learn through first hand experience, the fundamentals of experimentation and computer modeling. MSD:Materials Science Division
254-NST-1 : NANOSCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) is a premier user facility providing expertise, instrumentation, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. The center's goal is to perform basic research and instrumentation development that explores ways to tailor nanoscale interactions by creating, visualizing, and assembling hybrid nanomaterial architectures for energy-related research and development programs. High-impact staff and user science is accommodated within the primary cross-cutting theme of "Energy and Information Transduction at the Nanoscale" that addresses grand challenges in energy and information conversion and transport (transduction), while furthering the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) missions of energy generation, storage, and efficiency. Please see http://www.anl.gov/cnm for many more details. NST:Nanoscience and Technology
259-OTT-1 : OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSER (OTT) Characterize Laboratory technology portfolios, identify appropriate potential technology transfer partners and conduct focused marketing activities. <br /> Solicit feedback and perform surveys regarding the effectiveness of OTT activities. <br /> Initiate contact with potential industrial partners and work with them to commercialize new scientific advances. <br /> Develop new license agreements and other innovative approaches for transferring intellectual property into commercial use. <br /> Define and implement action to exploit opportunities for new start-up businesses built on Argonne technology. OTT:Office of Technology Transfer
260-PHY-1 : SUPERCONDUCTING HEAVY-ION LINAC ATLAS The Physics Division is the home of the world’s first radio-frequency superconducting ion accelerator, the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator Systems, ATLAS. This accelerator is based on superconducting radio-frequency resonators and can accelerate any ion protons (atomic mass 1) to uranium (atomic mass 238). ATLAS is a Department of Energy National User’s Facility that provides high quality ion beams for basic research in nuclear science as described in the next section. The accelerator physics staff based at ATLAS is active in a variety of research and development projects. The topics include superconducting radio-frequency resonator, ion sources based on microwave-heated plasmas, ion beam dynamics simulations, computer control systems, and other related topics. Much of the present research and development is directed towards a major upgrade of the ATLAS Facility to improve the maximum beam current and total system efficiency and on collaborative developments with other facilities to develop high current superconducting linac applications. Topics currently being pursued for this new project also include the design and testing of high-power targets and associated ion sources for the production, extraction, and ionization of short-lived radioisotopes. Novel methods are also being developed for the efficient acceleration of these rare isotopes. PHY:Physics Division
261-PHY-1 : NUCLEAR REACTIONS AND NUCLEAR STRUCTURE STUDIES BY HEAVY IONS Nuclear structure and reactions are studied in collisions between complex nuclei with heavy-ion beams mostly from the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator (ATLAS), a national heavy-ion users facility. The major thrusts of this program are three-fold: (a) the understanding of the nucleus as a many-body system built of protons and neutrons and governed by the strong force, (b) the exploration of the origin of the chemical elements and their role in shaping the reactions that occur in the cataclysmic events of the cosmos and (c) tests of the limits of validity of the Standard Model, the fundamental theory that currently best represents our understanding of the laws and fundamental symmetries of Nature. <br /> The specific current research topics include the development and acceleration of short-lived nuclei and their use in measurements of cross-sections of astrophysics interests as well as in nuclear structure and reaction dynamics studies; the production and study of nuclei at the very limits of stability, including the discovery of new proton emitters near the drip line, and the study of the properties of very heavy elements (actinide and transfermium (Z>100) nuclei), the study of exotic nuclear shapes; the delineation of the essential parameters governing dynamics of reactions between heavy nuclei; tests of current descriptions of the weak force. <br /> These efforts are based on forefront instrumentation available at ATLAS which includes: (1) Gammasphere, the national gamma-ray facility composed of 110 Compton-suppressed, large volume Ge detectors; (2) the Fragment Mass Analyzer, which separates nuclear reaction products from the beam and transports them to a detection station; (3) the Canadian Penning Trap, which measures nuclear masses with unsurpassed accuracy; (4) the HELIOS spectrometer to study light charged-particle transfer reactions in inverse kinematics; (5) a magnetic spectrograph for the detection of high-velocity reaction products; (6) a large, versatile reaction chamber; (7) and a number of gamma-ray detectors including Compton-suppressed germanium spectrometers and Nal and BaF2 scintillators. <br /> There are always opportunities for research participants to be involved in every aspect of the program from the development of detectors to the actual running of experiments, and from the analysis of data to the development of simulations and/or calculations to assist in the interpretation of the results. PHY:Physics Division
262-PHY-1 : NUCLEAR PHYSICS AT INTERMEDIATE ENERGIES The origin of the basic nuclear force between protons and neutrons is explored in our program of Nuclear Physics at Intermediate Energies. In particular, the role of the constituents of the nucleons, i.e. quarks and gluons, in a fundamental description of nuclear forces is examined in experiments primarily utilizing electromagnetic probes. A number of studies are currently in progress at the TJNAF (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility). Physics Division staff members led in the construction of experimental facilities, serve as spokespersons for a number of experiments, and are actively involved in others. Studies of fundamental symmetries that make use of parity violating electron scattering are also performed at Jefferson Lab. <br />A second major component of our program involves high energy experiments that probe the structure of the quark sea in the nucleon. These experiments are performed at Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory). . <br />A third component of our program uses atomic physics techniques to search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry in nuclear systems. Such studies may ultimately explain the excess of matter over anti-matter in the universe. A related application developed in the group, Atom Trap Trace Analysis, provides very sensitive trace isotope measurements of noble gas atoms that are used for radiochronology dating of ancient water or ice for geologic and hydrologic studies. More information can be found at http://www.phy.anl.gov/mep/index.html. Opportunities exist for research participants to be involved in all aspects of our work. <br /> PHY:Physics Division
263-PHY-1 : THEORY RESEARCH Theory Group <br />Theoretical research in Argonne's Physics Division addresses a broad range of problems involving the structure and dynamics of hadrons and nuclei, with the aim of understanding the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe – the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself; and the Theory Group develops innovative methods to tackle the associated intellectual challenges and provide answers to these most fundamental questions. In pursuing these goals, there is a strong emphasis on comparison with data provided by experimental groups at Argonne and at other facilities around the world. A brief overview of our program is available here. (http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/theoryoverview.html) <br />In more detail, the principal areas of research include those described below: <br />• Nuclear dynamics with sub-nucleonic degrees of freedom <br />• http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/subnucleon.html <br />• Nuclear forces and nuclear systems <br />• http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/forces.html <br />• Heavy-ion reactions and nuclear structure <br />• http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/heavyion.html <br />• Atomic theory and fundamental quantum mechanics <br />• http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/atomic.html <br />Several of these projects require major numerical simulations using massively parallel state-of-the-art computers, including the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's (http://www.alcf.anl.gov/) IBM Blue Gene/Q (Mira http://www.alcf.anl.gov/mira ) and the Laboratory Computer Resource Center's http://www.lcrc.anl.gov/; Linux cluster (Blues; http://www.lcrc.anl.gov/about/blues). Many projects also involve collaborators at US and foreign universities, and other national laboratories. <br /> PHY:Physics Division
264-PHY-1 : LASER TRAPPING AND PROBING OF EXOTIC ATOMS 292-PHY-1 LASER TRAPPING AND PROBING OF EXOTIC ATOMS Trapping and Probing Atoms of Rare Isotopes with Laser Light. <br />We are developing new methods and improvements to existing techniques for controlling atoms of rare isotopes, which we are using to study new problems in nuclear physics and to develop novel applications based on Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). http://www.phy.anl.gov/mep/atta/index.html <br /> PHY:Physics Division
265-PHY-1 : ACCELERATOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Our accelerator R&D program focusses on applying superconductivity RF techniques to heavy ion accelerators and on producing and accelerating radioactive beams. Our accelerator physicists are conducting a broad range of R&D to establish key technologies for the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The ATLAS program continues to optimize its operations and develop new linear accelerator technology to provide beams having higher intensity with excellent quality. We review operational issues continuously and enhance the facility’s capabilities frequently. We are investigating technical and research issues relating to acceleration of beams of short-lived nuclei. <br /> <br /> PHY:Physics Division
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